Skip to main content
Outdated Browser

For the best experience using our website, we recommend upgrading your browser to a newer version or switching to a supported browser.

More Information

India

The covers of all the books featured in the list
12 Global Children’s Books for History Lovers
By Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp
In celebration of #WorldKidLitMonth, Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp recommends 12 international books for young readers with an interest in world history.
Sketch of Infernal Landscape by Hieronymus Bosch
Rik Klein Gotink and Robert G. Erdmann, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Seeking Shelter in Language
By Saudamini Deo
In English, Hindi, and Bangla—the languages I use daily—we spoke only of death and distress.
Ellamma Is Distressed
By Gogu Shyamala
They may even throw us out of this village.
Translated from Telugu by P. Pavana
Portrait of writer and translator Nisha Susan
“Women with Highly Irregular Minds”
By Suhasini Patni
In all these years that I’ve spent writing in English, I’ve always felt that my leaning toward literariness was informed by Malayalam.
“The Joy of Cultural Mixing”: Daljit Nagra on Retelling the Classic Ramayana in Punglish
By Samantha Schnee
Humor was essential for my Ramayana.
An International Menagerie: Animal Stories
By Susan Harris
Some of the animals here possess the power of speech, deploying it to often subversive ends.
Portrait of Meena Kandasamy
Image Copyright © Varun Vasudevan
The Poetry of Radical Female Fighters
By Suhasini Patni
When you are not held back by any fear, you can write songs of liberation.
Double portrait of writer Jhumpa Lahiri
Where I Find Myself
By Jhumpa Lahiri
I have come to think of any “definitive text” largely the same way that I think of a mother tongue, at least in my case: an inherently debatable, perpetually relative concept.
Why Must Two Works be Compared at All?
By Saudamini Deo
Why must two works be compared at all?
Celebrating Kazi Nazrul Islam, Rebel Poet of Bengal
By Liesl Schwabe
Much of the radical heart of Nazrul’s larger oeuvre, including his work as a freedom fighter, has been overlooked.
10 Translated Books from India to Read Now
By Arunava Sinha
Both list-makers and editors seem to forget that India is in fact a country with 20,000 tongues, which are variations of over 120 distinct languages.
On the “Good” in “Good Traveler”
By Shahnaz Habib
Travel is a self-improvement project that has been sold to us as a world-improvement project.
Road Stories: International Writing on Travel
By Susan Harris
Some of the writers here document their own trips, while others invent characters and send them on the road.
Across Mountains and Valleys: Stories of Migration from the Kinnaur and Spiti Valleys
By Arshia Sattar
Despite their specificity, these tales transcend the places that produced them and throb with a universal appeal.
The Story of Sunni and Bhunku
By Himalayan Oral Tradition
Why, oh why, did you not come back immediately?
Translated from Lahouli by Noor Zaheer
The Girl Who Turned into a Crocodile
By Himalayan Oral Tradition
She struggled and fought back and tried to save herself but could not overcome the great crocodile that had taken hold of her.
Translated from Lahouli by Noor Zaheer
When the Deer Moved Away
By Himalayan Oral Tradition
Deeku refused to understand the close bond between the humans and the deer and their dependence on each other.
Translated from Lahouli by Noor Zaheer
Beyond “Untouchability”: Dalit Literature in Hindi
By Laura Brueck & Christi A. Merrill
Dalit literature represents some of the most meaningful, socially engaged narrative voices in India today.
Our Village
By Mohan Das Namishray
It would be difficult to find a single man whose back had not been scarred by the whip of the thakur or his agents.
Translated from Hindi by Laura Brueck & Christi A. Merrill
Gujji
By Suraj Badtiya
Although his name wasn’t Gujji to begin with, he was Gujji now.
Translated from Hindi by John Vater
The Case of the Quota Candidate
By Anita Bharti
We are here to teach, not to meddle in the affairs of other people.”
Translated from Hindi by Swarnim Khare
from “Doubly Cursed”
By Kausalya Baisantry
There were a few people in our basti who couldn’t bear our improved circumstances.
Translated from Hindi by Christi A. Merrill
Fragmentation
By Ajay Navaria
“There must be a misunderstanding.
Translated from Hindi by Laura Brueck
“Chhanna,” the Metal Bowl
By Amarjit Chandan
This bowl is older than I.
Translated from Punjabi by Sarabjeet Garcha
Mustard Flowers
By Ajmer Rode
Morning starts / when lights turn green.
Translated from Punjabi by the author
While I Slept
By Navtej Bharati
I will not accept this old age / grafted slyly on my body.
Translated from Punjabi by the author
Standing on Ashes: Three Punjabi Poets on Aging
By Sonnet Mondal
Punjabi poetry stands on ashes, reinforced by a blend of spirituality and dissent.
Devdas
By Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay
She searched for an answer, embarrassed for the first time in her life at having to say what she was about to.
Translated from Bengali by Arunava Sinha
The House of Wax
By Subodh Ghosh
“Have you been able to forget me?”
Translated from Bengali by Somrita Ganguly
Heeng Kochuri
By Bibhutibhushan Bandyopadhyay
I cannot serve a glass of water to a Brahmin’s son.
Translated from Bengali by Arunava Sinha
Shaheb Bibi Golam
By Bimal Mitra
It was late. Who knew where Bhootnath could buy liquor at this hour?
Translated from Bengali by Somrita Ganguly
Recalculating the Hexagon: The New French Literature
By Susan Harris
These writers have migrated geographically and, in some cases, linguistically.
The Man with a Guava Tree
By Shumona Sinha
“Why? Wasn’t there a guava tree at the other guy’s place?”
Translated from French by Roland Glasser
I Will Die Young
By Rasul Mīr
Are they more beautiful than me?
Translated from Kashmiri by Sonam Kachru
I Will Not Sing
By Dīna Nāth Nādim
When the thunder of guns tears out the tongue from the nightingale
Translated from Kashmiri by Sonam Kachru
The jewels of my eyes I’ll lay at your feet
By Arinimal
Hyacinth! Lift your head your head from within the mud
Translated from Kashmiri by Neerja Mattoo
Multimedia
Simurgh
By Sonam Kachru, Neerja Mattoo & Arshia Sattar
The texts we were working with were profoundly unstable.
Born of earth, I fell into contemplation
By Roop Bhawani
You kindled hope in me. Now fill my cups.
Translated from Kashmiri by Neerja Mattoo
Multimedia
Voices Unheard: Tribal Literature from India to Read Now
By Pooja Shankar
Until recently, the tribal literature created in non-mainstream languages has not been very recognized or available for an Indian or global audience.
There Is No Map: The New Italian(s)
By Alta L. Price
Who is Italian, what is the Italian language, and who deserves to write in it?
Barbie
By Gabriella Kuruvilla
He was fascinated with India: I represented its Italian branch, easily accessible.
Translated from Italian by Jamie Richards
Multilingual
Listening to Silence
By Laila Wadia
“I gallop in English, I am a towering dervish in Urdu, and Hindi is my Kama Sutra. I am still on all fours in Italian.”
Translated from Italian by Sole Anatrone
Multilingual
Changing Landscapes and Identities: An Introduction to Tamil Writing
By Lakshmi Holmström
So changing landscapes are also about changing identities.
Ayya’s Bicycle
By Sukumaran
“Ayya won’t come to school on his bicycle anymore from now on, it seems, da.”
Translated from Tamil by Lakshmi Holmström
Multilingual
Two Minutes
By Ashokamitran
Someone had left the corpse on the bicycle.
Translated from Tamil by Padma Narayanan & Subashree Krishnaswamy
A Mansion with Many Rooms
By Kutti Revathi
“As if you have to ask that low-caste boy’s permission in order to see your own mother!”
Translated from Tamil by Lakshmi Holmström
A Mousy, Measly Tale
By Dilip Kumar
Though married, I practice celibacy very strictly.
Translated from Tamil by Padma Narayanan
What Did Sriraman Say?
By Perundevi
The wretch was standing there / in a Che Guevara T-shirt and sunglasses—
Translated from Tamil by Padma Narayanan & Subashree Krishnaswamy
Multilingual
Truth and Lies
By Imayam
The only thing that I lack is a single letter from you.
Translated from Tamil by Lakshmi Holmström
Multilingual
Highway
By Malathi Maithri
Along the highways / of a refugee’s life / snapshots of childhood memories / hang:
Translated from Tamil by Lakshmi Holmström
Revolution Nathan
By Dhamayanthi
I thought just speaking to Nathan was like participating in a revolution.
Translated from Tamil by Lakshmi Holmström
Trespass
By Sundara Ramaswamy
It was not possible to think of the youth’s transgression as accidental.
Translated from Tamil by Lakshmi Holmström
Fear
By Krishangini
Fear depends on the mind; / the mind depends on experience.
Translated from Tamil by Padma Narayanan & Subashree Krishnaswamy
The Great Lord Pabori
By Anonymous
“I am the Great Lord Pabori, who eats the roast of seven lions!”
Translated from Sindhi by Musharraf Ali Farooqi
The Stork and the She-Stork
By Anonymous
“I was a fool. I will die and you will live. Return to our young now!”
Translated from Sindhi by Musharraf Ali Farooqi
The Two Sparrows
By Anonymous
The cat said, “If I fetch him from down here, what will you give me?”
Translated from Sindhi by Musharraf Ali Farooqi
The Folktales of Sindh: An Introduction
By Musharraf Ali Farooqi
It is likely that in the folktales preserved in the Sindhi language, we can find the structures and traces of the earliest stories from the Indus Valley Civilization.
Toba Tek Singh
By Saadat Hasan Manto
Two or three years after Partition, the governments of Pakistan and India decided to exchange lunatics in the same way that they had exchanged civilian prisoners.
Translated from Urdu by Richard McGill Murphy
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]