Skip to main content
Outdated Browser

For the best experience using our website, we recommend upgrading your browser to a newer version or switching to a supported browser.

More Information

Fiction

The Killer

By Beka Kurkhuli
Translated from Georgian by Natalia Bukia-Peters & Victoria Field
Listen to author Beka Kurkhuli read "The Killer" in the original Georgian.
 
 

In the end, one sentence awaits us all—death
Joseph Brodsky

Because we are all murderers, he told himself. We are all on both sides, if we are any good, and no good will come of any of it.
Ernest Hemingway, Islands in the Stream

God inscribed my grief
On my sword
I killed the man I’d sworn to be a brother to
I used a sword on my brother
They are chasing me to murder me
They put a trap for me on the road

Folk song

The sea was calm. It stretched far away to the horizon and cautiously touched the shore with a swishing sound. It glimmered calmly under the wide-open blue deep and alien sky. An enormous cluster of clouds sailed across the clear sky like a space shuttle reflected in the swelling sea.

He was swimming in warm, slightly ruffled waves. Then he dove, opened his eyes and saw the fragmented white rays of the sun descending into the dark-greenish, yellowish sea water. They were making their way to the bottom of the sea.

Suddenly he felt something long, and thin as a thread, pierce him under his left shoulder blade. Once, twice and three times and the sun hurtled down and spread its white rays at lightning speed across the sea and it struck for the fourth time under his shoulder blade. His heart stopped. “I’m dying,” he thought and started to sink toward the bottom of the white, illuminated sea, like a white harpooned shark. He tried to get back up to the surface. “No, I can’t. I am dying!” he thought a second time and began desperately to panic. He couldn’t move, he couldn’t even move his arm. “I’ve died, you motherfucker, I’ve died!” His whole body writhed, he moved his shoulders and immediately an unbearable pain shot through his entire body like fire. He had never been afraid of pain, but he certainly didn’t want to die, especially not in a thick, sticky, treacherous white sea that had stuck a needle in his back, beneath his left shoulder blade. “You motherfucker,” he said to the pain, to the whiteness that was strangely illuminated from within, and to the treacherous sea and to his own pierced heart. He struggled again, then paddled with his legs too.

The surface of the sea was visible far above. It was a long way away, but it was there. It was definitely there. He started moving slowly and after a while he surged out of the sea, shaking his head. Immediately his wide-open eyes, crazy with terror, encountered the hot sun.

He swam toward the shore. He swam through the thick white sea and he could no longer feel his heart. The shore was black and it wasn’t expecting anyone.

***   

Gia Ezukhbaia, a six-foot-tall, former partisan from Nabakevi nicknamed Pshaveti, sat on a seat that had been ripped out of a Ford minibus on the first floor of the long, faceless, two-story former House of Culture in the village of Akhalkakhati near Zugdidi. He averted his face from the heat coming from the red-hot stove and listened to his wife complaining.

Gia Ezukhbaia’s wife was kneading dough in an enamel bowl on the long table near the tap. She cooked maize bread in an iron pan. She was complaining in time with the thudding sounds of the dough.

“I curse you because you didn’t make me happy, you made me unhappy, me and my children, you idiot, you idiot, if you wanted a life like this, why did you marry if you were going to make us miserable? Who will defend you, you wretched fool, who’s your patron and who’s grateful to you? Here’s your Georgia, let it help you now. I’m baking the last of the bread, look at my hands, I’m peeling every last bit of dough from my fingers. You made enemies of the Abkhazians, you made enemies of the Georgians, and now everyone’s trying to kill you. The whole family’s got to sleep behind three iron gates and our hearts explode with fear at every movement. At any moment someone could pour some petrol and set us and the children on fire. Is this any kind of life? We’re half a kilometer from the Enguri River, the Abkhazians could be here in two minutes. How come you’re fighting in the war? Who needed your war and who have you hurt with your fighting?”

Gia Ezukhbaia wasn’t nicknamed Pshaveti because he was one of the cold-blooded Georgian partisans on the Enguri embankment and drank the blood of Abkhazians and Russians. It was more because he was very witty and he swore a lot, unlike Mingrelians. Now, though, he sat quietly, fiddling aimlessly with a piece of wood, and listened to his wife’s complaining.

“You should have stayed behind to mind your own business, in which case you could have gone to Nabakevi, picked a few oranges, some hazelnuts, you could have given them away, begrudgingly. The whole village of Gali goes there, and they don’t touch the villagers. People work, they earn some pennies. The Kishmaris even got a kettle.”

“Yes, sure, I’d slave for those bastards!”

Gia stoked up the stove with some wood and banged its door closed.

“They aren’t slaves at all. No, you’re the only one who’s here! It’s beneath your dignity. You say you’re a partisan but I’m frightened of going out because you owe money at the kiosk. The whole of the Gali region returns home and according to you, they’re all slaves. They return to their land, they build houses, they begin their lives again, they don’t do it for nothing. They’re not for the Russians and not for the Abkhazians. They move freely. As for you, stay here and kill people . . .”

“Stop your nagging! Shut up, I’m telling you I won’t go back there carrying Russian papers, and that’s the end of it.”

“Oh, yes, as if you’re Prince Tsotne Dadiani himself, saint and martyr. Even if you wanted to, who would let you return, you miserable creature with blood all over your hands. How many sins have you committed? Your children will be answerable for them. You know that, don’t you?”

”Stop talking like that, I’m telling you.”

“What shall I stop doing? What? Kill me too and that’ll be the end of it. I’m not afraid of anything anymore, I can’t take any more, I’ve already lost my mind. This bloody war is over for everyone, except for you and your friends, all drug addicts and thieves. The whole of Abkhazia and Samegrelo is after you, you’ll never be able to go back home now.”

“What is it you want, woman? What?”

“I’ve been telling you since this morning what I want. Don’t you hear anything I say? You only want to do what you want and you aren’t interested in anything else. But we both see what happens when you do exactly what you want.”

“Shut up and bake your bread. Don’t talk when it’s none of your business.”

“I bore you four children and you say it’s not my business? The eldest is twenty-two already, if you remember? The kids have seen nothing but war and trouble. Don’t they need to study, set up home, start a family? Never mind studying and setting up a home, your children are hungry, they haven’t got any clothes. He’s a fighter so he can’t help himself . . . . I wonder who it is you’re fighting with apart from yourself?”

Gia took some wood out from under the stove, looked at it, fiddled with it, then threw it back. He lit up a cheap Astra cigarette and inhaled deeply.

“You’ve got nothing to complain about, you live as you wish. I’m the one crying my eyes out, living with you. Why did I marry you, what was I thinking? My father was beside himself, don’t marry him, he kept saying.”

“Come off it, it’s not as if our getting married would kill him!”

“Even if he hasn’t died, I’d rather die myself if I can’t go to my own cousin’s funeral. You can bury me alive and that will be that. You won’t let me mourn my own flesh and blood, Gia Ezukhbaia, may God deprive you of any mourners on account of your sins against me.”

“Woman, you’ll put me in the grave with your nagging. Ugh.”

“Who’ll put you in the grave and who’ll kill you, you idiot?”

“I’m sincerely sorry I didn’t get myself killed but what can I do about it now?”

He felt a wave of shame in front of his wife. He knew she was right, but he couldn’t bring himself to say a word. His wife’s cousin had died and she lived close by, just a few houses away, but his wife couldn’t go to pay her respects because she didn’t have any shoes. She couldn’t go there to give her condolences when all she had to wear were her red and blue striped slippers. Gia racked his brains over where and how he could get her some shoes, but he couldn’t think of anything.

Gia Ezukhbaia came into this war rather late. The main action was taking place in Kumistavi and Sukhumi, which seemed a long way from the district of Gali. At first, he didn’t think the war had anything to do with him. Now that the guys from Tbilisi had rushed in to help the people of Abkhazia sort out their business, it was for them to put it all to rights, it was their problem. What’s more, Ezukhbaia, like most Mingrelians, didn’t have any time for the so-called State Council military units, especially after the events that had taken place not so far away in the districts of Zugdidi and Tsalenjikha. Hidden in Gali and Abkhazia, loyal members of the military and supporters of the first president, Zviad Gamsakhurdia, told tales about the cruelty of the putschists and the Tbilisi Military Council. They didn’t actually need to tell tales as Ezukhbaia’s native village, Nabakevi, was only a few kilometres from the Enguri river and the deafening sound of shooting from across the river was clearly audible, and they could see flames too, flying high up into the sky. So Gia Ezukhbaia wasn’t that surprised when the Tbilisi people went on to Abhazeti after Samegrelo, nor was he that upset about it. He didn’t consider himself to be on the side of the government’s army, much less think that the Abkhazians were on his side—he remembered only too well the confrontation with them in the summer of 1989, when he and some others rushed the Galidzgi Bridge with his double-barreled shotgun after the Abkhazians had ravaged Sukhumi University during entrance exams. They had thrown portraits of Georgian writers out onto the streets and killed Vova Vekua and some other residents of Sukhumi. Later, it seemed everything had calmed down, he became friendly with Abkhazians and he personally had no quarrel with Abkhazians about anything. After December 1991, the start of the civil war when the shooting and bloodshed began, the confrontations between citizens in Tbilisi were immediately echoed in Abkhazia.

The Abkhazians tried their hardest to remain neutral during the internal conflicts of the Georgians, but in spite of this, war broke out anyway in August 1992. By that time Gia Ezukhbaia was already forty-eight and he had seen everything and so he didn’t trust either side. In this time of mayhem and infernos, he, his elder brother and cousins tried to protect their homes, their mandarin and hazelnut plantations and property, and somehow he actually managed to do so, sometimes by cunning and sometimes by force. He didn’t get involved in anything else beyond that.

His heart first missed a beat when, between the fourteenth and sixteenth of March 1993, Russians, Armenians, Abkhazians, and North Caucasians invaded the outskirts of Sukhumi and the Russian Air Force bombed Sukhumi several times. Refugees started leaving Sukhumi and the people of Gali began packing their bags in anticipation of what might happen. However, as it turned out, the Georgians fought valiantly and Sukhumi was saved. After that, it was only a little while before the Ezukhbaias got involved in the war.

Events developed as follows. Gia Ezukhbaia’s childhood friend and classmate Dato Shervashidze arrived from Riga to attend the funeral of his old friend Pridon Marshania. Marshania was involved with the Mkhedrioni and had been fighting from the very first day of the war. Marshania was killed near Ochamchire during the operation to open the road between Ochamchire and Sukhumi. Pridon Marshania and Dato Shervashidze had several things in common while Gia Ezukhbaia was just a peasant, with his mandarins, hazelnuts, and cattle. As for Shervashidze and Marshania, they had been running for gangsters since they were kids, to Moscow, to Rostov. Criminals, drugs and so on. Then Dato settled in Riga together with his family, took care of his business and didn’t give a thought to Georgia for a long time, even after the war began. And now he’d flown from Riga to mourn his murdered friend. He had only just managed to get to Ilori from Tbilisi, to the Marshania’s two-story house where the bullet-riddled body of Pridon Marshania lay, no longer able hear the sound of the women’s keening reaching the sky.

The Ezukhbaias traveled to Ilori in two cars as it was very dangerous to travel by car in those days. They were stopped three times on the road from Nabakevi to Ilori, but as soon as those who stopped them heard where they were going, they were allowed to pass without any problems.

Gia Ezukhbaia and his elder brother were welcomed by the men who were bustling about in the yard, and the encounter between the Ezukhbaias and Dato Shervashidze was very special. They stood for a long time embracing each other as Gia secretly wiped away his tears then stared into Dato’s impassive face.

“Dato, brother, how are you, brother? What a place and what a reason for us to meet each other, isn’t it, oh, fuck it, fuck your mother.

“I fuck everyone’s mother, whores, goats, shameful bitches and rent boys, I’ll make those murderers spit blood.”

“What can you do, Dato, what do you want to do and what can you do? They’re all bastards whether they’re over here or over there.”

“The way they killed my Pridon Marshania, the way they bumped him off for nothing, those whores…”

“I tried so many times to persuade him not to interfere, not to get involved. What do you want to do that for, I said, these guys are motherfuckers and those are too, both sides are coming to invade us, why do you need to get yourself killed? It’s not our fight, these jackal politicians come along, make us enemies to one another, make us slaughter each other and then carry on their business. Meanwhile, we’ll remain blood enemies and all this’ll happen because of their politics and greedy stomachs. We simple people will be made to suffer. But he didn’t believe me. You couldn’t make him listen to anything. No, he said, they are brothers. What sort of brothers, committing such horrors as they did in Samegrelo? And who are the Abkhazians? I personally have no reason to fight with Abkhazians! All those poor bastards are my relatives and have the same surnames.”

Gia Ezukhbaia and Dato Shervashidze hadn’t seen each other for years and as usual, they stuck firmly together during the whole business of the wake and mourning. They drank, Dato did some drugs, he wept quietly, tears rolling down from behind his black sunglasses. He asked Gia about local affairs, then he lost interest and stopped listening to Gia’s Megrelian arguments and swearing.

“How are the children? How’s your wife?” he asked Gia quietly when at one point they were keeping vigil for Pridon Marshania while Gia’s elder nephew was reading Psalm 90 aloud to the deceased.

“She’s all right, I dunno really. How do you think she’d be, putting up with us?”

“You’ve got two boys and a girl, haven’t you?”

“I’ve got two boys and two girls. Both boys are called Dato, in your honor.”

“Come on, what do you mean, man, both brothers have the same name?”

“I call one Dato and the other one Data!”

“You’re one crazy motherfucker!” It was the first time Dato Shervashidze had laughed during these days.

The next day after the funeral, Dato Shervashidze dropped in on Gia Ezukhbaia, taking some gifts for his namesakes. The Ezukhbaias laid the table. Dato Ezukhbaia was silent during the whole feast and he even dozed off a couple of times, but his silence was eloquent. It was Gia who began to speak.

“When are you heading back to the Baltics, Dato? We’ll see you off. You need to be seen off properly, it’s the right thing to do. It’s a very bad time here now. Ah!”

The steady dull sound of gunfire came from outside.

Dato Shervashidze had been drinking chacha, 45 proof, but he suddenly sobered up and said:

“I’m not going anywhere from here!”

Gia’s older brother immediately understood and shook his head quietly.

“Come on, what are you gonna do? What the hell is there here for you? Don’t say this shit, are you crazy? Our dear departed Pridon Marshania didn’t believe me either and now he’s lying in the ground, God bless his soul. Can’t you see what’s happening in this place full of weeping mothers? What have you lost in this hellhole, you motherfucker?. . . Come on, buddy, if only I had some place to go like you do, I wouldn’t . . . ”

“So who will I leave Pridon with? Who will I leave you with? And what’ll I do then back in Riga? Arse around having fun? Fuck the Baltics, what have they got to do with me? Am I going to leave my brother lying in the ground, sacrifice him without any revenge and run away myself?  Where should I run away to, Gia?  Who should I run away from?  Should I run away from these rats and whores? How can I run? And leave you just like that, will I? And what would you say then if that’s what I did, eh? Dato Shervashidze is one cold dude, he wants to do what he wants to do, does he do the right thing? Eh? You’d fucking curse me!”

“I won’t curse you! Just go, be well and I swear on the lives of all my four children I won’t curse you, I won’t call you a motherfucker. I swear brother, this older one . . .”

“No, you won’t do it, you won’t have to curse me. That’s it, I’m staying, it’s a done deal. If I go, it means I’ve chickened out. I’ve never run away from anything, you know that.”

“What about your wife and children? What are you going to do with your family? Are you leaving them in Riga or what?”

“They’re OK there. What about yours here? Or your children aren’t children and your family’s not a family, how can they put up with this hell? Let them put up with it in Riga as well.”

Gia looked at his childhood friend with alarm.

“Sure, that’s all clear, but what are we going to do now, Dato?” the older brother asked Gia.

“I spoke to Marshania’s brothers who belong to the Mkhedrioni. I told them I was staying. They’ll help us with everything.”

“That’s no good, I don’t like having anything to do with the Mkhedrioni. They won’t understand us. The people in Abkhazia won’t understand us either, Dato . . .”

“Who gives a shit about the people! People are the same as the Mkhedrioni, what do you want from the Mkhedrioni, what’s wrong with them, the same people join the Mkhedroni, what makes you think otherwise? They don’t fall from the sky, they’re one of us too. It was people who created that Mkhedrioni, they run to them first to inform on who’s got so many flocks of sheep and who’s kicking off what problems with who. I’m certain of it. Those shitfaces, whores …”

“I know all these troubles better than you, but all the same, I won’t go to them, I don’t like those people!” said Gia Ezukhbaia.

“OK, as you like, if you don’t want to, we won’t go to the Mkhedrioni. They can just help us get weapons. We’ll stay separate. We’ll call ourselves the Gali Battalion, I dunno, what does it matter?”

“Nothing matters,” Gia Ezukhbai agreed. He was thoughtful.

“Do you have a weapon?”

“Sure, we’ve certainly got weapons,” said Gia Ezukhbaia and averted his eyes from his pale wife, who was leaning against the dresser, her hands over her mouth.

“We’re getting together in Gali tomorrow at ten o’clock. There’ll be weapons waiting for us there too. There won’t be any problems regarding any weapon. I don’t want to argue about whether you’re coming or you’re not coming, you’ll remain my brothers until death.”

Gia Ezukhbaia’s older brother sat silently. He’d already made up his mind.

“Go to hell!” said Gia Ezukhbaia, his voice cracking.

“I’m off, and thank you very much for everything. My apologies to the ladies, I’ve caused you a lot of bother. God bless you.”

They kissed each other at the gates while parting.

“Fuck their mother, those whores who put my Pridon Marshania under the earth, fuck all their mothers . . .” said Dato Shervashidze, high on drugs, getting into the car and revving the engine. The lights from the fast-moving car danced around in the dark for a long time as the car rattled away over the potholes along the road.

At ten in the morning they met up in Gali. Dato Shervashidze came along at eleven, hardly able to open his eyes. And it started. They fought mainly in Ochamchire: Kochara, Tsageri, Kidgi, Tamishi,Tsebelda, Labra. During the first battle near Kochara, Gia Ezukhbaia couldn’t lift his head. He was lost amid the roaring and shooting. “If only I could be safe now, God, I won’t come back here again,” he said to himself with his head down in the muddy earth and his eyes firmly on the green blades of grass. His older brother came running up. “What’s wrong with you, you aren’t wounded, are you?” Pale Gia only managed to shake his head to say no. “Shoot now, or shame on you,” his brother told him quietly and then, bending over, he ran back to his position and sat down near a gray wall with peeling plaster which was all that remained of the abandoned, gutted farmhouse—and carried on shooting. Gia saw how the twinkling red-yellow flame emerged from the shaking machine gun in his brother’s hands. His brother’s face was calm and he shot round after round at steady intervals. He took careful aim and fired. “My brother’s strong, that bastard, he’s always been strong . . . ach, when will all this end and when will it get dark? Ach, Dato Shervashidze, where did you bring me and what you are you putting me through? Mother, what the hell is this! God, save me now and fuck anyone who would come back here . . . What have I got to do with the war and shooting and why did I get involved in this massacre? What kind of general am I, wretched me?” Then he lifted the machine gun above his head and pressed the trigger. Even in that atmosphere of roaring, the piercing, deafening sound of his machine gun hammered on his eardrums. The red-hot cartridge cases falling from the machine gun scattered around on the ground, producing a cold, ringing sound. “Ouch, when will this cursed thing be over, I wish it would get dark at least . . .” The sun continued to shine brightly and that day claimed many lives before the night fell.

In the evening when everything was over and they got back together, Gia felt very ashamed. He was especially ashamed in front of the young guys from Tbilisi who knocked back drinks carelessly and discussed with the locals the quality of local joints and how to get hold of some hash. “When a man of my age throws away his hoe and spade and picks up a gun, nothing will come out of this man,” he said out loud. The guys from Tbilisi smiled tolerantly and a bit ironically too. ”That’s nothing to worry about, uncle, at the beginning we all pissed ourselves in terror, that’s what happens at first,” said the youngest one of the Tbilisi guys, a baby face who couldn’t be older than his nephew. “Look at him, what can you say when this kid has to defend you, man . . . I can’t let on I’m scared stiff or these bastards will never let me forget it.”

“When we put an end to this disaster, I promise you some good Otobyia hashish!”

“Is it strong?” The youngest one’s eyes lit up.

The older Ezukhbaia sat at the foot of a tree, quiet and thoughtful as usual. He shook his head unhappily at Gia’s words.

“You’re over the top, Dato, it’s not good, you know you don’t need it,” he told Shervashidze.

Dato Shervashidze sat quietly on somebody’s rucksack, he was sweating profusely and could hardly breathe.

“He was chasing the bullet, this damned idiot,” thought Gia Ezukhbaia. “It all depends on the man, but Dato and his brother fought well even though they were in battle for the first time.”

“Pridon was everybody’s brother and we all loved him a lot, but you have to do things carefully and sensibly. Just following your heart doesn’t help get things done, but hey, that’s what you’re doing,” the older Ezukhbaia told Dato.

“He shouldn’t have got involved in this cock-up, those crooked politicians start something in their offices then good guys die on both sides and nothing happens to those at the top. They couldn’t give a rip whether we die or not, they’ll even use it to their advantage. He shouldn’t have got involved. If I’d been here I would have prevented it, but now what can you say to him, he’s pushing up daisies, it’s too late now,” said Dato Shervashidaze, his hissing voice sounding strange. Then he put his hand into his chest pocket and took out a piece of silver paper folded into four and turned his black glasses toward the guys from Tbilisi.

“Hey, here it is, but be careful, it has a kick, don’t overdo it.”

The youngest one of the Tbilisi guys approached him slowly, walking with a theatrical air and took it.

“Thanks. And you?”

“I don’t smoke that stuff.”

“Dato, perhaps you can get hold of someone there in Abkhazia, you’ve got some good honest, sensible people. Perhaps we can bring this bad thing to a close . . .”

Dato Shervashidze took out a cigarette and lit up.

“It’s not going to end now,” he said eventually. “Slavika’s already been killed in Kapi. He tried to help the Georgian priest in Gagra, the Russians had put a rubber tire on him and were going to burn him. He stood in front of this priest in Kapi and shouted, What are you doing, you whores? Without any gun and with his bare heart he covered the priest. The Cossacks killed Slavika after the Georgian priest in Kapi and burned both of them together anyway. Our lot, Abkhazians, said they would find those Cossacks. Where can you find those beggars, they don’t have any breeding or sense of race or home or honor? And Beso Agrba fights on their side, the Georgians set fire to his cousin in a tank near Gumista and he’s taking revenge. Dima Argun’s uncle was killed in Gagra, his blood relative, his mother’s brother, and he’s fighting against us too. The Mebonia lot, people like ‘sukhumski,’ Tatash Chkhotua and Dato Gerdzmava avoided the whole thing from the very beginning. They’re in Russia, in Moscow. They phoned me several times, they were going to visit me in Riga. There’s yet more folk but they can’t make up their mind, what can they do, who would listen to what they have to say, fuck their mothers, the thugs. They’ve sold everything and it’s all sewn up.”

Gia Ezukhbaia listened to them quietly. This conversation made his body feel even colder. He held on to his machine gun with all his might and tried not to pay attention to his heart, which was sinking with fear. “I wonder what’s happening at our place, how they’re getting on at home?” he asked his older brother.

Gia’s older brother shrugged his shoulders and looked away to one side.

The following day, early in the morning, Shervashidze shot up, then they went out to the crossroads to a standpipe to wash their faces.

“Eh, what’s happening at home, brother, I wonder, how are they and what are they’re doing? They’re probably nervous and worrying a lot.” Gia Ezukhbaia repeated what he’d said the previous day.

“Why are you going on about home? How do I know what’s happening there. Whose house is it anyway?” the older Ezukhbaia suddenly started shouting furiously.

“Why are you shouting?”

Suddenly, there was the sound of ferocious shooting. The sound of gunfire was coming toward them very quickly.

The village was being attacked. The fighters dispersed chaotically, running to find the most advantageous positions that were relatively safe and tactically correct. Only Dato walked because he wasn’t up to running.

Gia Ezukhbaia together with Shukria Diasamidze from Batumi ran quickly to the very first courtyard and set up an ambush in the corner of an abandoned house with broken windows. Shukria Diasamidze sat close by, near the outside kitchen.

“Have you seen my people by any chance?” Gia Ezukhbaia shouted, pale faced and looking around. He was looking for his brother and Dato Shervashidze.

His question was lost in the noise of Shukria Diasamidze’s machine gun. Diasamidze shot one round and he shot carefully. Gia Ezukhbaia shot bullet after bullet to the opening at the end of the courtyard.

A bit later, a round of four bullets hit Diasamidze in the right side of his chest. A fourth bullet grazed his shoulder. Gia quickly ran up to him, sat down beside him, and stared bewildered at Shukria’s quivering face and the pink bubbles of blood appearing at his mouth. One bullet had gone through his lung. It was the first time Gia had seen a man killed by gunshot and he couldn’t believe his eyes when he saw how, even though he was already dead, for a few seconds Shukria Diasamidze kept pulling at the belt of his submachine gun and how the fingers of his right hand were convulsing.

Gia Ezukhbaia felt a weight lifted from him. He got up from where Shukria Diasamidze was lying and stretched, carefully avoiding stepping in the pool of blood that had suddenly spread all around. He then leaned the machine gun butt against his shoulder and fired the whole cartridge in the direction of the end of the orchard and then, while still standing, he replaced the cartridge and fired once again. He could hear the characteristic hissing sound of the bullets whizzing past him. Only yesterday, that sound was enough to freeze his blood in their veins, but now that no longer happened. It didn’t happen and that’s all there is to it. Neither the explosion of a mine nearby nor the soil that had fallen on him, nor the hissing sound of more frequent bullets, shot one by one, could make him lower his head.

The Willys drew up at the gates near the house with a squawking noise. People got out, then carried Shukria Diasamidze back to the vehicle.

“Makes no sense, he’s dead and done for,” a voice sounded.

They laid Shukria Diasamidze’s body carefully at the edge of the road.

“Get in touch with San Sanich with the walkie-talkie, he can come with the Gazik,” said one of them, running toward Gia, bending double.

A little later, the others rushed into the courtyard as well, including the older Ezukhbaia and Dato Shervashidze. They sat down at the foot of the tree. Dato Shervashidze insisted on getting up onto his feet several times. The Ezukhbaias tried to stop him by swearing and shouting, but it was already too late. Shervashidze fell down. He was lucky. The bullet had gone through his side.

Both the Ezukhbaia men rushed to Dato Shervashidze.

”See what he’s done, insisting on having his own way. I’m the son of a whore . . .”

“Come on, bring him here, what was he doing, the bastard, really he’s not all together . . .”

“Let me go, there’s nothing wrong with me, it’s a flesh wound!”

”Shut up or I’ll kill you with my own hands. It went through his flesh, son of a bitch.”

They forcibly shoved Dato into the nearby Willys.

“Take him, take him away from here! Who’s this crazy SOB, he’s been high since this morning and he can’t feel anything anymore. You’re the one who should be worrying about him . . .”

At the end of the day, impregnated with the smell of gun powder, Gia Ezukhbaia sat at the foot of the tree and smoked one cigarette after another and thought about the blood of Shukria Diasamidze from Batumi. He didn’t remember Shukria himself very well, he had only met him the previous evening and they had soon gone to bed and in the morning they had got involved in the fighting. He couldn’t help thinking about the pool under Shukria Diasamidze’s body, the blood the color of red wine, flooding like the sea. He had the feeling that that the man’s blood was his very own. Then he got used to it. He was no longer petrified with fear.

He got used to it. He got used to shooting, but he found it more difficult to get used to things other than shooting. For a week after the battle had erupted, he hadn’t been able to touch any food. He was hungry, but he felt no hunger. On the contrary, at the end of each day when he saw how the warriors gulped stewed meat and condensed milk straight from the tins or guzzled half-raw stolen pork, he felt sick the whole time. “How can those wretches eat among so many dead people, blood and gunfire?” But not long afterward, in a manner he didn’t even understand himself, he began to use the bayonet of his Kalashnikov rifle to eat stewed meat mixed with lumps of fat straight from the tin.

 

© Beka Kurkhuli. By arrangement with the author. Translation © 2018 by Natalia Bukia-Peters and Victoria Field. All rights reserved.

English Georgian

In the end, one sentence awaits us all—death
Joseph Brodsky

Because we are all murderers, he told himself. We are all on both sides, if we are any good, and no good will come of any of it.
Ernest Hemingway, Islands in the Stream

God inscribed my grief
On my sword
I killed the man I’d sworn to be a brother to
I used a sword on my brother
They are chasing me to murder me
They put a trap for me on the road

Folk song

The sea was calm. It stretched far away to the horizon and cautiously touched the shore with a swishing sound. It glimmered calmly under the wide-open blue deep and alien sky. An enormous cluster of clouds sailed across the clear sky like a space shuttle reflected in the swelling sea.

He was swimming in warm, slightly ruffled waves. Then he dove, opened his eyes and saw the fragmented white rays of the sun descending into the dark-greenish, yellowish sea water. They were making their way to the bottom of the sea.

Suddenly he felt something long, and thin as a thread, pierce him under his left shoulder blade. Once, twice and three times and the sun hurtled down and spread its white rays at lightning speed across the sea and it struck for the fourth time under his shoulder blade. His heart stopped. “I’m dying,” he thought and started to sink toward the bottom of the white, illuminated sea, like a white harpooned shark. He tried to get back up to the surface. “No, I can’t. I am dying!” he thought a second time and began desperately to panic. He couldn’t move, he couldn’t even move his arm. “I’ve died, you motherfucker, I’ve died!” His whole body writhed, he moved his shoulders and immediately an unbearable pain shot through his entire body like fire. He had never been afraid of pain, but he certainly didn’t want to die, especially not in a thick, sticky, treacherous white sea that had stuck a needle in his back, beneath his left shoulder blade. “You motherfucker,” he said to the pain, to the whiteness that was strangely illuminated from within, and to the treacherous sea and to his own pierced heart. He struggled again, then paddled with his legs too.

The surface of the sea was visible far above. It was a long way away, but it was there. It was definitely there. He started moving slowly and after a while he surged out of the sea, shaking his head. Immediately his wide-open eyes, crazy with terror, encountered the hot sun.

He swam toward the shore. He swam through the thick white sea and he could no longer feel his heart. The shore was black and it wasn’t expecting anyone.

***   

Gia Ezukhbaia, a six-foot-tall, former partisan from Nabakevi nicknamed Pshaveti, sat on a seat that had been ripped out of a Ford minibus on the first floor of the long, faceless, two-story former House of Culture in the village of Akhalkakhati near Zugdidi. He averted his face from the heat coming from the red-hot stove and listened to his wife complaining.

Gia Ezukhbaia’s wife was kneading dough in an enamel bowl on the long table near the tap. She cooked maize bread in an iron pan. She was complaining in time with the thudding sounds of the dough.

“I curse you because you didn’t make me happy, you made me unhappy, me and my children, you idiot, you idiot, if you wanted a life like this, why did you marry if you were going to make us miserable? Who will defend you, you wretched fool, who’s your patron and who’s grateful to you? Here’s your Georgia, let it help you now. I’m baking the last of the bread, look at my hands, I’m peeling every last bit of dough from my fingers. You made enemies of the Abkhazians, you made enemies of the Georgians, and now everyone’s trying to kill you. The whole family’s got to sleep behind three iron gates and our hearts explode with fear at every movement. At any moment someone could pour some petrol and set us and the children on fire. Is this any kind of life? We’re half a kilometer from the Enguri River, the Abkhazians could be here in two minutes. How come you’re fighting in the war? Who needed your war and who have you hurt with your fighting?”

Gia Ezukhbaia wasn’t nicknamed Pshaveti because he was one of the cold-blooded Georgian partisans on the Enguri embankment and drank the blood of Abkhazians and Russians. It was more because he was very witty and he swore a lot, unlike Mingrelians. Now, though, he sat quietly, fiddling aimlessly with a piece of wood, and listened to his wife’s complaining.

“You should have stayed behind to mind your own business, in which case you could have gone to Nabakevi, picked a few oranges, some hazelnuts, you could have given them away, begrudgingly. The whole village of Gali goes there, and they don’t touch the villagers. People work, they earn some pennies. The Kishmaris even got a kettle.”

“Yes, sure, I’d slave for those bastards!”

Gia stoked up the stove with some wood and banged its door closed.

“They aren’t slaves at all. No, you’re the only one who’s here! It’s beneath your dignity. You say you’re a partisan but I’m frightened of going out because you owe money at the kiosk. The whole of the Gali region returns home and according to you, they’re all slaves. They return to their land, they build houses, they begin their lives again, they don’t do it for nothing. They’re not for the Russians and not for the Abkhazians. They move freely. As for you, stay here and kill people . . .”

“Stop your nagging! Shut up, I’m telling you I won’t go back there carrying Russian papers, and that’s the end of it.”

“Oh, yes, as if you’re Prince Tsotne Dadiani himself, saint and martyr. Even if you wanted to, who would let you return, you miserable creature with blood all over your hands. How many sins have you committed? Your children will be answerable for them. You know that, don’t you?”

”Stop talking like that, I’m telling you.”

“What shall I stop doing? What? Kill me too and that’ll be the end of it. I’m not afraid of anything anymore, I can’t take any more, I’ve already lost my mind. This bloody war is over for everyone, except for you and your friends, all drug addicts and thieves. The whole of Abkhazia and Samegrelo is after you, you’ll never be able to go back home now.”

“What is it you want, woman? What?”

“I’ve been telling you since this morning what I want. Don’t you hear anything I say? You only want to do what you want and you aren’t interested in anything else. But we both see what happens when you do exactly what you want.”

“Shut up and bake your bread. Don’t talk when it’s none of your business.”

“I bore you four children and you say it’s not my business? The eldest is twenty-two already, if you remember? The kids have seen nothing but war and trouble. Don’t they need to study, set up home, start a family? Never mind studying and setting up a home, your children are hungry, they haven’t got any clothes. He’s a fighter so he can’t help himself . . . . I wonder who it is you’re fighting with apart from yourself?”

Gia took some wood out from under the stove, looked at it, fiddled with it, then threw it back. He lit up a cheap Astra cigarette and inhaled deeply.

“You’ve got nothing to complain about, you live as you wish. I’m the one crying my eyes out, living with you. Why did I marry you, what was I thinking? My father was beside himself, don’t marry him, he kept saying.”

“Come off it, it’s not as if our getting married would kill him!”

“Even if he hasn’t died, I’d rather die myself if I can’t go to my own cousin’s funeral. You can bury me alive and that will be that. You won’t let me mourn my own flesh and blood, Gia Ezukhbaia, may God deprive you of any mourners on account of your sins against me.”

“Woman, you’ll put me in the grave with your nagging. Ugh.”

“Who’ll put you in the grave and who’ll kill you, you idiot?”

“I’m sincerely sorry I didn’t get myself killed but what can I do about it now?”

He felt a wave of shame in front of his wife. He knew she was right, but he couldn’t bring himself to say a word. His wife’s cousin had died and she lived close by, just a few houses away, but his wife couldn’t go to pay her respects because she didn’t have any shoes. She couldn’t go there to give her condolences when all she had to wear were her red and blue striped slippers. Gia racked his brains over where and how he could get her some shoes, but he couldn’t think of anything.

Gia Ezukhbaia came into this war rather late. The main action was taking place in Kumistavi and Sukhumi, which seemed a long way from the district of Gali. At first, he didn’t think the war had anything to do with him. Now that the guys from Tbilisi had rushed in to help the people of Abkhazia sort out their business, it was for them to put it all to rights, it was their problem. What’s more, Ezukhbaia, like most Mingrelians, didn’t have any time for the so-called State Council military units, especially after the events that had taken place not so far away in the districts of Zugdidi and Tsalenjikha. Hidden in Gali and Abkhazia, loyal members of the military and supporters of the first president, Zviad Gamsakhurdia, told tales about the cruelty of the putschists and the Tbilisi Military Council. They didn’t actually need to tell tales as Ezukhbaia’s native village, Nabakevi, was only a few kilometres from the Enguri river and the deafening sound of shooting from across the river was clearly audible, and they could see flames too, flying high up into the sky. So Gia Ezukhbaia wasn’t that surprised when the Tbilisi people went on to Abhazeti after Samegrelo, nor was he that upset about it. He didn’t consider himself to be on the side of the government’s army, much less think that the Abkhazians were on his side—he remembered only too well the confrontation with them in the summer of 1989, when he and some others rushed the Galidzgi Bridge with his double-barreled shotgun after the Abkhazians had ravaged Sukhumi University during entrance exams. They had thrown portraits of Georgian writers out onto the streets and killed Vova Vekua and some other residents of Sukhumi. Later, it seemed everything had calmed down, he became friendly with Abkhazians and he personally had no quarrel with Abkhazians about anything. After December 1991, the start of the civil war when the shooting and bloodshed began, the confrontations between citizens in Tbilisi were immediately echoed in Abkhazia.

The Abkhazians tried their hardest to remain neutral during the internal conflicts of the Georgians, but in spite of this, war broke out anyway in August 1992. By that time Gia Ezukhbaia was already forty-eight and he had seen everything and so he didn’t trust either side. In this time of mayhem and infernos, he, his elder brother and cousins tried to protect their homes, their mandarin and hazelnut plantations and property, and somehow he actually managed to do so, sometimes by cunning and sometimes by force. He didn’t get involved in anything else beyond that.

His heart first missed a beat when, between the fourteenth and sixteenth of March 1993, Russians, Armenians, Abkhazians, and North Caucasians invaded the outskirts of Sukhumi and the Russian Air Force bombed Sukhumi several times. Refugees started leaving Sukhumi and the people of Gali began packing their bags in anticipation of what might happen. However, as it turned out, the Georgians fought valiantly and Sukhumi was saved. After that, it was only a little while before the Ezukhbaias got involved in the war.

Events developed as follows. Gia Ezukhbaia’s childhood friend and classmate Dato Shervashidze arrived from Riga to attend the funeral of his old friend Pridon Marshania. Marshania was involved with the Mkhedrioni and had been fighting from the very first day of the war. Marshania was killed near Ochamchire during the operation to open the road between Ochamchire and Sukhumi. Pridon Marshania and Dato Shervashidze had several things in common while Gia Ezukhbaia was just a peasant, with his mandarins, hazelnuts, and cattle. As for Shervashidze and Marshania, they had been running for gangsters since they were kids, to Moscow, to Rostov. Criminals, drugs and so on. Then Dato settled in Riga together with his family, took care of his business and didn’t give a thought to Georgia for a long time, even after the war began. And now he’d flown from Riga to mourn his murdered friend. He had only just managed to get to Ilori from Tbilisi, to the Marshania’s two-story house where the bullet-riddled body of Pridon Marshania lay, no longer able hear the sound of the women’s keening reaching the sky.

The Ezukhbaias traveled to Ilori in two cars as it was very dangerous to travel by car in those days. They were stopped three times on the road from Nabakevi to Ilori, but as soon as those who stopped them heard where they were going, they were allowed to pass without any problems.

Gia Ezukhbaia and his elder brother were welcomed by the men who were bustling about in the yard, and the encounter between the Ezukhbaias and Dato Shervashidze was very special. They stood for a long time embracing each other as Gia secretly wiped away his tears then stared into Dato’s impassive face.

“Dato, brother, how are you, brother? What a place and what a reason for us to meet each other, isn’t it, oh, fuck it, fuck your mother.

“I fuck everyone’s mother, whores, goats, shameful bitches and rent boys, I’ll make those murderers spit blood.”

“What can you do, Dato, what do you want to do and what can you do? They’re all bastards whether they’re over here or over there.”

“The way they killed my Pridon Marshania, the way they bumped him off for nothing, those whores…”

“I tried so many times to persuade him not to interfere, not to get involved. What do you want to do that for, I said, these guys are motherfuckers and those are too, both sides are coming to invade us, why do you need to get yourself killed? It’s not our fight, these jackal politicians come along, make us enemies to one another, make us slaughter each other and then carry on their business. Meanwhile, we’ll remain blood enemies and all this’ll happen because of their politics and greedy stomachs. We simple people will be made to suffer. But he didn’t believe me. You couldn’t make him listen to anything. No, he said, they are brothers. What sort of brothers, committing such horrors as they did in Samegrelo? And who are the Abkhazians? I personally have no reason to fight with Abkhazians! All those poor bastards are my relatives and have the same surnames.”

Gia Ezukhbaia and Dato Shervashidze hadn’t seen each other for years and as usual, they stuck firmly together during the whole business of the wake and mourning. They drank, Dato did some drugs, he wept quietly, tears rolling down from behind his black sunglasses. He asked Gia about local affairs, then he lost interest and stopped listening to Gia’s Megrelian arguments and swearing.

“How are the children? How’s your wife?” he asked Gia quietly when at one point they were keeping vigil for Pridon Marshania while Gia’s elder nephew was reading Psalm 90 aloud to the deceased.

“She’s all right, I dunno really. How do you think she’d be, putting up with us?”

“You’ve got two boys and a girl, haven’t you?”

“I’ve got two boys and two girls. Both boys are called Dato, in your honor.”

“Come on, what do you mean, man, both brothers have the same name?”

“I call one Dato and the other one Data!”

“You’re one crazy motherfucker!” It was the first time Dato Shervashidze had laughed during these days.

The next day after the funeral, Dato Shervashidze dropped in on Gia Ezukhbaia, taking some gifts for his namesakes. The Ezukhbaias laid the table. Dato Ezukhbaia was silent during the whole feast and he even dozed off a couple of times, but his silence was eloquent. It was Gia who began to speak.

“When are you heading back to the Baltics, Dato? We’ll see you off. You need to be seen off properly, it’s the right thing to do. It’s a very bad time here now. Ah!”

The steady dull sound of gunfire came from outside.

Dato Shervashidze had been drinking chacha, 45 proof, but he suddenly sobered up and said:

“I’m not going anywhere from here!”

Gia’s older brother immediately understood and shook his head quietly.

“Come on, what are you gonna do? What the hell is there here for you? Don’t say this shit, are you crazy? Our dear departed Pridon Marshania didn’t believe me either and now he’s lying in the ground, God bless his soul. Can’t you see what’s happening in this place full of weeping mothers? What have you lost in this hellhole, you motherfucker?. . . Come on, buddy, if only I had some place to go like you do, I wouldn’t . . . ”

“So who will I leave Pridon with? Who will I leave you with? And what’ll I do then back in Riga? Arse around having fun? Fuck the Baltics, what have they got to do with me? Am I going to leave my brother lying in the ground, sacrifice him without any revenge and run away myself?  Where should I run away to, Gia?  Who should I run away from?  Should I run away from these rats and whores? How can I run? And leave you just like that, will I? And what would you say then if that’s what I did, eh? Dato Shervashidze is one cold dude, he wants to do what he wants to do, does he do the right thing? Eh? You’d fucking curse me!”

“I won’t curse you! Just go, be well and I swear on the lives of all my four children I won’t curse you, I won’t call you a motherfucker. I swear brother, this older one . . .”

“No, you won’t do it, you won’t have to curse me. That’s it, I’m staying, it’s a done deal. If I go, it means I’ve chickened out. I’ve never run away from anything, you know that.”

“What about your wife and children? What are you going to do with your family? Are you leaving them in Riga or what?”

“They’re OK there. What about yours here? Or your children aren’t children and your family’s not a family, how can they put up with this hell? Let them put up with it in Riga as well.”

Gia looked at his childhood friend with alarm.

“Sure, that’s all clear, but what are we going to do now, Dato?” the older brother asked Gia.

“I spoke to Marshania’s brothers who belong to the Mkhedrioni. I told them I was staying. They’ll help us with everything.”

“That’s no good, I don’t like having anything to do with the Mkhedrioni. They won’t understand us. The people in Abkhazia won’t understand us either, Dato . . .”

“Who gives a shit about the people! People are the same as the Mkhedrioni, what do you want from the Mkhedrioni, what’s wrong with them, the same people join the Mkhedroni, what makes you think otherwise? They don’t fall from the sky, they’re one of us too. It was people who created that Mkhedrioni, they run to them first to inform on who’s got so many flocks of sheep and who’s kicking off what problems with who. I’m certain of it. Those shitfaces, whores …”

“I know all these troubles better than you, but all the same, I won’t go to them, I don’t like those people!” said Gia Ezukhbaia.

“OK, as you like, if you don’t want to, we won’t go to the Mkhedrioni. They can just help us get weapons. We’ll stay separate. We’ll call ourselves the Gali Battalion, I dunno, what does it matter?”

“Nothing matters,” Gia Ezukhbai agreed. He was thoughtful.

“Do you have a weapon?”

“Sure, we’ve certainly got weapons,” said Gia Ezukhbaia and averted his eyes from his pale wife, who was leaning against the dresser, her hands over her mouth.

“We’re getting together in Gali tomorrow at ten o’clock. There’ll be weapons waiting for us there too. There won’t be any problems regarding any weapon. I don’t want to argue about whether you’re coming or you’re not coming, you’ll remain my brothers until death.”

Gia Ezukhbaia’s older brother sat silently. He’d already made up his mind.

“Go to hell!” said Gia Ezukhbaia, his voice cracking.

“I’m off, and thank you very much for everything. My apologies to the ladies, I’ve caused you a lot of bother. God bless you.”

They kissed each other at the gates while parting.

“Fuck their mother, those whores who put my Pridon Marshania under the earth, fuck all their mothers . . .” said Dato Shervashidze, high on drugs, getting into the car and revving the engine. The lights from the fast-moving car danced around in the dark for a long time as the car rattled away over the potholes along the road.

At ten in the morning they met up in Gali. Dato Shervashidze came along at eleven, hardly able to open his eyes. And it started. They fought mainly in Ochamchire: Kochara, Tsageri, Kidgi, Tamishi,Tsebelda, Labra. During the first battle near Kochara, Gia Ezukhbaia couldn’t lift his head. He was lost amid the roaring and shooting. “If only I could be safe now, God, I won’t come back here again,” he said to himself with his head down in the muddy earth and his eyes firmly on the green blades of grass. His older brother came running up. “What’s wrong with you, you aren’t wounded, are you?” Pale Gia only managed to shake his head to say no. “Shoot now, or shame on you,” his brother told him quietly and then, bending over, he ran back to his position and sat down near a gray wall with peeling plaster which was all that remained of the abandoned, gutted farmhouse—and carried on shooting. Gia saw how the twinkling red-yellow flame emerged from the shaking machine gun in his brother’s hands. His brother’s face was calm and he shot round after round at steady intervals. He took careful aim and fired. “My brother’s strong, that bastard, he’s always been strong . . . ach, when will all this end and when will it get dark? Ach, Dato Shervashidze, where did you bring me and what you are you putting me through? Mother, what the hell is this! God, save me now and fuck anyone who would come back here . . . What have I got to do with the war and shooting and why did I get involved in this massacre? What kind of general am I, wretched me?” Then he lifted the machine gun above his head and pressed the trigger. Even in that atmosphere of roaring, the piercing, deafening sound of his machine gun hammered on his eardrums. The red-hot cartridge cases falling from the machine gun scattered around on the ground, producing a cold, ringing sound. “Ouch, when will this cursed thing be over, I wish it would get dark at least . . .” The sun continued to shine brightly and that day claimed many lives before the night fell.

In the evening when everything was over and they got back together, Gia felt very ashamed. He was especially ashamed in front of the young guys from Tbilisi who knocked back drinks carelessly and discussed with the locals the quality of local joints and how to get hold of some hash. “When a man of my age throws away his hoe and spade and picks up a gun, nothing will come out of this man,” he said out loud. The guys from Tbilisi smiled tolerantly and a bit ironically too. ”That’s nothing to worry about, uncle, at the beginning we all pissed ourselves in terror, that’s what happens at first,” said the youngest one of the Tbilisi guys, a baby face who couldn’t be older than his nephew. “Look at him, what can you say when this kid has to defend you, man . . . I can’t let on I’m scared stiff or these bastards will never let me forget it.”

“When we put an end to this disaster, I promise you some good Otobyia hashish!”

“Is it strong?” The youngest one’s eyes lit up.

The older Ezukhbaia sat at the foot of a tree, quiet and thoughtful as usual. He shook his head unhappily at Gia’s words.

“You’re over the top, Dato, it’s not good, you know you don’t need it,” he told Shervashidze.

Dato Shervashidze sat quietly on somebody’s rucksack, he was sweating profusely and could hardly breathe.

“He was chasing the bullet, this damned idiot,” thought Gia Ezukhbaia. “It all depends on the man, but Dato and his brother fought well even though they were in battle for the first time.”

“Pridon was everybody’s brother and we all loved him a lot, but you have to do things carefully and sensibly. Just following your heart doesn’t help get things done, but hey, that’s what you’re doing,” the older Ezukhbaia told Dato.

“He shouldn’t have got involved in this cock-up, those crooked politicians start something in their offices then good guys die on both sides and nothing happens to those at the top. They couldn’t give a rip whether we die or not, they’ll even use it to their advantage. He shouldn’t have got involved. If I’d been here I would have prevented it, but now what can you say to him, he’s pushing up daisies, it’s too late now,” said Dato Shervashidaze, his hissing voice sounding strange. Then he put his hand into his chest pocket and took out a piece of silver paper folded into four and turned his black glasses toward the guys from Tbilisi.

“Hey, here it is, but be careful, it has a kick, don’t overdo it.”

The youngest one of the Tbilisi guys approached him slowly, walking with a theatrical air and took it.

“Thanks. And you?”

“I don’t smoke that stuff.”

“Dato, perhaps you can get hold of someone there in Abkhazia, you’ve got some good honest, sensible people. Perhaps we can bring this bad thing to a close . . .”

Dato Shervashidze took out a cigarette and lit up.

“It’s not going to end now,” he said eventually. “Slavika’s already been killed in Kapi. He tried to help the Georgian priest in Gagra, the Russians had put a rubber tire on him and were going to burn him. He stood in front of this priest in Kapi and shouted, What are you doing, you whores? Without any gun and with his bare heart he covered the priest. The Cossacks killed Slavika after the Georgian priest in Kapi and burned both of them together anyway. Our lot, Abkhazians, said they would find those Cossacks. Where can you find those beggars, they don’t have any breeding or sense of race or home or honor? And Beso Agrba fights on their side, the Georgians set fire to his cousin in a tank near Gumista and he’s taking revenge. Dima Argun’s uncle was killed in Gagra, his blood relative, his mother’s brother, and he’s fighting against us too. The Mebonia lot, people like ‘sukhumski,’ Tatash Chkhotua and Dato Gerdzmava avoided the whole thing from the very beginning. They’re in Russia, in Moscow. They phoned me several times, they were going to visit me in Riga. There’s yet more folk but they can’t make up their mind, what can they do, who would listen to what they have to say, fuck their mothers, the thugs. They’ve sold everything and it’s all sewn up.”

Gia Ezukhbaia listened to them quietly. This conversation made his body feel even colder. He held on to his machine gun with all his might and tried not to pay attention to his heart, which was sinking with fear. “I wonder what’s happening at our place, how they’re getting on at home?” he asked his older brother.

Gia’s older brother shrugged his shoulders and looked away to one side.

The following day, early in the morning, Shervashidze shot up, then they went out to the crossroads to a standpipe to wash their faces.

“Eh, what’s happening at home, brother, I wonder, how are they and what are they’re doing? They’re probably nervous and worrying a lot.” Gia Ezukhbaia repeated what he’d said the previous day.

“Why are you going on about home? How do I know what’s happening there. Whose house is it anyway?” the older Ezukhbaia suddenly started shouting furiously.

“Why are you shouting?”

Suddenly, there was the sound of ferocious shooting. The sound of gunfire was coming toward them very quickly.

The village was being attacked. The fighters dispersed chaotically, running to find the most advantageous positions that were relatively safe and tactically correct. Only Dato walked because he wasn’t up to running.

Gia Ezukhbaia together with Shukria Diasamidze from Batumi ran quickly to the very first courtyard and set up an ambush in the corner of an abandoned house with broken windows. Shukria Diasamidze sat close by, near the outside kitchen.

“Have you seen my people by any chance?” Gia Ezukhbaia shouted, pale faced and looking around. He was looking for his brother and Dato Shervashidze.

His question was lost in the noise of Shukria Diasamidze’s machine gun. Diasamidze shot one round and he shot carefully. Gia Ezukhbaia shot bullet after bullet to the opening at the end of the courtyard.

A bit later, a round of four bullets hit Diasamidze in the right side of his chest. A fourth bullet grazed his shoulder. Gia quickly ran up to him, sat down beside him, and stared bewildered at Shukria’s quivering face and the pink bubbles of blood appearing at his mouth. One bullet had gone through his lung. It was the first time Gia had seen a man killed by gunshot and he couldn’t believe his eyes when he saw how, even though he was already dead, for a few seconds Shukria Diasamidze kept pulling at the belt of his submachine gun and how the fingers of his right hand were convulsing.

Gia Ezukhbaia felt a weight lifted from him. He got up from where Shukria Diasamidze was lying and stretched, carefully avoiding stepping in the pool of blood that had suddenly spread all around. He then leaned the machine gun butt against his shoulder and fired the whole cartridge in the direction of the end of the orchard and then, while still standing, he replaced the cartridge and fired once again. He could hear the characteristic hissing sound of the bullets whizzing past him. Only yesterday, that sound was enough to freeze his blood in their veins, but now that no longer happened. It didn’t happen and that’s all there is to it. Neither the explosion of a mine nearby nor the soil that had fallen on him, nor the hissing sound of more frequent bullets, shot one by one, could make him lower his head.

The Willys drew up at the gates near the house with a squawking noise. People got out, then carried Shukria Diasamidze back to the vehicle.

“Makes no sense, he’s dead and done for,” a voice sounded.

They laid Shukria Diasamidze’s body carefully at the edge of the road.

“Get in touch with San Sanich with the walkie-talkie, he can come with the Gazik,” said one of them, running toward Gia, bending double.

A little later, the others rushed into the courtyard as well, including the older Ezukhbaia and Dato Shervashidze. They sat down at the foot of the tree. Dato Shervashidze insisted on getting up onto his feet several times. The Ezukhbaias tried to stop him by swearing and shouting, but it was already too late. Shervashidze fell down. He was lucky. The bullet had gone through his side.

Both the Ezukhbaia men rushed to Dato Shervashidze.

”See what he’s done, insisting on having his own way. I’m the son of a whore . . .”

“Come on, bring him here, what was he doing, the bastard, really he’s not all together . . .”

“Let me go, there’s nothing wrong with me, it’s a flesh wound!”

”Shut up or I’ll kill you with my own hands. It went through his flesh, son of a bitch.”

They forcibly shoved Dato into the nearby Willys.

“Take him, take him away from here! Who’s this crazy SOB, he’s been high since this morning and he can’t feel anything anymore. You’re the one who should be worrying about him . . .”

At the end of the day, impregnated with the smell of gun powder, Gia Ezukhbaia sat at the foot of the tree and smoked one cigarette after another and thought about the blood of Shukria Diasamidze from Batumi. He didn’t remember Shukria himself very well, he had only met him the previous evening and they had soon gone to bed and in the morning they had got involved in the fighting. He couldn’t help thinking about the pool under Shukria Diasamidze’s body, the blood the color of red wine, flooding like the sea. He had the feeling that that the man’s blood was his very own. Then he got used to it. He was no longer petrified with fear.

He got used to it. He got used to shooting, but he found it more difficult to get used to things other than shooting. For a week after the battle had erupted, he hadn’t been able to touch any food. He was hungry, but he felt no hunger. On the contrary, at the end of each day when he saw how the warriors gulped stewed meat and condensed milk straight from the tins or guzzled half-raw stolen pork, he felt sick the whole time. “How can those wretches eat among so many dead people, blood and gunfire?” But not long afterward, in a manner he didn’t even understand himself, he began to use the bayonet of his Kalashnikov rifle to eat stewed meat mixed with lumps of fat straight from the tin.

 

© Beka Kurkhuli. By arrangement with the author. Translation © 2018 by Natalia Bukia-Peters and Victoria Field. All rights reserved.

მკვლელი

ბექა ქურხული
«В конце концов, всех нас ждёт один приговор – Смерть.»
Иосиф Бродский
«Все мы убийцы, все – и на этой стороне, и на той,
и ни к чему хорошему это не приведёт.»
Эрнест Хемингуэй

`მე ჩემი უბედურება
ღმერთმა დამწერა ხმალზედა.
მე მოვკალ თავის ძმობილი,
ხმალი ვიხმარე ძმაზედა,
დამდევენ მოსაკლავადა,
საყუჩს მიდგამენ გზაზედა~
ხალხური

ზღვა წყნარი იყო. შორს, ჰორიზონტისკენ გაშლილი, ჩუმი შრიალით, ფრთხილად  ეხებოდა ნაპირს. წყნარად ციმციმებდა მის ზემოთ გაშლილი, ლურჯი, ღრმა და უცხო ცის ქვეშ. ლურჯ მოკრიალებულ ცაზე უზარმაზარი, ფთილებად შეკრული თეთრი ღრუბელი, კოსმოსური ხომალდივით მოცურავდა და მოტორტმანე ზღვაში ირეკლებოდა.
თბილ, ოდნავ აშლილ ტალღებში მიცურავდა. მერე ჩაყვინთა, თვალები გაახილა და ზღვის მომწვანო, მოყვითალო, მრუმე წყალში, თეთრად ნაწყვეტ-ნაწყვეტ, ჩამოყოლებული მზის სხივი დაინახა, რომელიც ფსკერისკენ მიიკვლევდა გზას.
და ეგრევე იგრძნო, მარცხენა ბეჭის ქვეშ როგორ გაუყარეს სპიცივით, გრძელი, ძაფივით წვრილი რაღაც. ერთხელ, მეორედ, მესამედ და თეთრად ჩამოშლილი მზის  სხივი ელვის სისწრაფით გაიშალა, ზღვა გათეთრდა და მეოთხედაც დასცხო, მარცხენა ბეჭის ქვეშ. გული გაჩერდა. `ე, ვკვდები~ გაიფიქრა და თეთრად განათებული, მურტლად გადათეთრებული ზღვის ფსკერისკენ,  ბარჯგაყრილი თეთრი ზვიგენივით დაეშვა. ზედაპირზე ამოსვლა სცადა. არა, ვეღარ _ `ე ვკვდები!~ გაიფიქრა და დაფეთდა. ვერ ტოკდებოდა, ხელსაც ვერ სძრავდა _ `მოვკვდი ტო, ე, შენი დედაც მოვკვდი!~. .  მთელი ტანითYშეირხა, მხრები გაამოძრავა და ეგრევე ცეცხლივით დაუარა მთელს სხეულში აუტანელმა ტკივილმა. ტკივილის არასოდეს ეშინოდა, სიკვდილი კი ძალიან არ ეხალისებოდა, მით უმეტეს ბლანტ, თეთრად შედედებულ მოღალატე ზღვაში, რომელმაც ზურგში მარცხენა ბეჭის ქვეშ სპიცი წაუყარა. `ერთი შენი დედაც~ – უთხრა ტკივილს, თეთრ, უცნაურად, შიგნიდან განათებულ და ვერაგ ზღვას, საკუთარ გაჩვრეტილ გულს და კიდევ გაიბრძოლა, მერე ფეხებიც აამუშავა. ზევით მაღლა ზედაპირი ჩანდა, შორს, მაგრამ იქ იყო. ნამდვილად იქ იყო. ნელა დაიძრა, ცოტა ხანში ზღვიდან ამოვარდა, თავი გაიქნია და ეგრევე დიდი, ყვითელი, ცხელი მზე მოძებნა, შიშისაგან გაგიჟებული, გადიდებული თვალებით.
ნაპირისკენ გამოცურა. მოცურავდა თეთრ, შედედებულ ზღვაში და გულს ვეღარ გრძნობდა. ნაპირი შავი იყო და არავის ელოდებოდა
____ – ____ – ____ – ____
ზუგდიდთან ახლოს, სოფელ ახალკახათის ყოფილ კულტურის სახლში, გრძელი, უსახური, ორსართულიანი შენობის მეორე სართულზე, `ფორდის~ მიკროავტობუსიდან ამოღებულ სავარძელში, ორმეტრიანი ნაბაკეველი პარტიზანი, გია ეზუხბაია, მეტსახელად `ფშავეთი~  იჯდა, გავარვარებული ღუმელის სიმხურვალეს სახეს არიდებდა და ცოლის ჩხუბს უსმენდა.
გია ეზუხბაიას ცოლი, ონკანთან, გრძელ მაგიდაზე, ემალის ტაშტში, ცომს ზელდა და იქვე შემოდგმულ თუჯის ტაფაში მჭადებს აცხობდა. ცომის ტყაპატყუპს  თითქოს რიტმში აყოლებდა ჩხუბს.
– შენ მოგეცა ჩემი ცოდვა, როგორც შენ მე არ გამახარე და გამაუბედურე, მეც და ჩემი შვილებიც, შე სულელო, შე სულელო შენ. . . თუ მასე გინდოდა ბატონო, ნუ მოეკიდებოდი ოჯახს, ნუ დაიდებდი ჩემი და ამ ბოვშვების ბრალს. . .  რა გინდოდა შე უბედურო  ა? მი დაგიცვენს სი საწყალი, მირე სკან მინჯე და მარდიელი, ამარ სი დო სკანი საქორთუო, ქინგეხვარას ასე(1),  უკანასკნელ ჭადს ვაცხობ ამას  ე, დამხედე ხელებზე, ბოლო ცომს ვიფხიკავ თითებიდან. აფხაზი მტრად მოიკიდე, ქართველი მტრად მოიკიდე, ყველა შენ დაგდევს მოსაკლავად. სამი რკინის კარს აქეთ რომ გვძინავს მთელს ოჯახს და ყოველ გაფაჩუნებაზე გული გვისკდება, ნავთი არ მოგვასხას ვინმემ, ცეცხლი არ მოგვცეს და ბავშვებიანა არ ამოგვბუგოსო, აგია ცხოვრება? . . კილომეტრნახევარია აქედან ენგურამდე, ორ წუთში აქ არის აფხაზი. მის ოკოდუ სკანი ომი, დო მის მუ დარკი?(2)
გია ეზუხბაიას `ფშავეთი~ იმიტომ კი არ დაარქვეს, რომ ენგურის მხარეს, ქართველ პარტიზანებში, ერთერთი ყველაზე მაგარი იყო და რუსებს და აფხაზებს სისხლს უშრობდა. უფრო იმიტომ რომ ძალიან მოსწრებული სიტყვის პატრონი იყო და მეგრელისთვის შეუფერებლად ბევრს იგინებოდა. ახლა კი ჩუმას იჯდა, უაზროდ ატრიალებდა ხელში შეშას და ცოლის ჩხუბს უსმენდა.
– დატეულიყავი შენთვის, გადახვიდოდი ახლა ნაბაკევში, ცოტას
მანდარინს მობოჭავდი, ცოტას თხილს მობოჭავდი, მიაშავებდი იმათაც და შენც დაგრჩებოდა რაღაც. მთელი გალი გადადის და აღარ ერჩიან იქით. მუშაობს ხალხი, რაღაც ორ კაპიკ ფარას შოულობს. ქიშმარიებმა საქონელიც გაიჩინეს ეგერ.
– ხო, თინებცალო მონებო ქიგუდირთუქ ხოლო თი ნაბოზრებს (3) – გიამ შეშა ღუმელში შეუკეთა და ჯახანით მიხურა კარი.
–    არაფერი მონები არ არიან ისინი. Aარა მარტო შენ ხარ აქ! როგორ გეკადრება. პარტიზან ვორექია დო ბუტკაშ ნისიაშ შიშით ქუჩაშა ვეგმართე(4) მთელი გალის რაიონი სახლში ბრუნდება და ყველა მონა ყოფილა აბა, თავის ეზო კარზე ბრუნდება ხალხი, სახლებს აშენებენ, ცხოვრებას  იწყობენ ისევ, არ კიდებს კაციშვილი ტყვილა ხელს. არც აფხაზი არც რუსი. დადიან თავისუფლად. შენ იჯექი აქ და ხოცე ხალხი. . .
– ნინა გაჩერ ოსურ, დო მურკ რაგადის გისხუნდას(5) არ დავბრუნდები მე იქ რუსის პროპუსკით ი ტოჩკა.
–    ოხ, ცოტნე დადიანი ტოჟე მნე. . . რომც გინდოდეს, ვინ დაგაბრუნებს შე უბედურო, კისრამდე სისხლში ხარ. Mრამდენი ცოდვა დაიდე გია ეზუხბაია და სულ ბავშვებს რომ მოეკითხებათ თუ იცი ეს შენ?
–    დაამთავრე ახლა მაგ ლაპარაკი გითხარი მე შენ.
–   რა დავამთავრო, რა დავამთავრო, მეც მომკალი ბარემ და ისაა, აღარ მეშინია აღარაფრის, ვეღარ ვუძლებ ამდენს, გავგიჟდი უკვე. რავა ყველასთვის დამთავრდა ის წყეული ომი, სკანი და სკანი მორფინისტ დო ყაჩაღ ჯიმაკოჩებიშ გარდა(6) მთელი აფხაზეთი და სამეგრელო, შენ დაგდევს, ვეღარასოდეს ვეღარ დაბრუნდები აწი სახლში შენ!
–    რა გინდა ქალო რა?
–   დილიდან მაგას გეუბნები რა მინდა, მაგრამ გესმის რამე? შენ ოღონდ შენი ჭკუით გატარა და მეტი არაფერი გაინტერესებს. რაც გამოდის მაგ შენი ჭკუით კი ვხედავთ ორივე.
–   გამოაცხე შენ მაგი ჭადი და გაჩუმდი. რაც არ გეკითხება ნუ ლაპარაკობ იმას.
–   ოთხი შვილი რომ გაგიჩინე, ის ხომ მეკითხებოდა? უფროსი 22 წლისაა უკვე თუ გახსოვს? არაფერი არ უნახავთ ომის და უბედურების მეტი. სწავლა არ უნდა ამათ, სახლ-კარი, დაოჯახება? სწავლა და სახლი კი არა, შიშვლები და მშივრები დაგიდიან ბოვშვები. მეომარია და რა ქნას. . . ვის ეომები ნეტავი საკუთარი თავის მეტს? . . .
გიამ ღუმლის ქვეშიდან შეშა გამოიღო, დახედა, ხელში შეათამაშა, მერე უკან შეაგდო, `ასტრას~ მოუკიდა და ღრმად ამოისუნთქა.
-თუ არა და შენ რა გიჭირს, როგორც გინდა ისე ცხოვრობ. მე ვარ
ცხარე ცრემლით სატირელი შენს ხელში. რას მოგდევდი, რა მინდოდა? თავს იკლავდა ცხონებული მამაჩემი არ გაყვეო.
-თავს იკლავდა არა ის კიდო. . .
-ის არ იკლავდა და მე მოვიკლავ საკუთარი ბიძაშვილის სამძიმარზე
რომ ვერ გადავიდე. ცოცხლად დამმარხე ბარემ და ისაა. ჩემი სისხლი და ხორცი არ დამატირებიე გია ეზუხბაია, შენ არ გეღირსოს დატირება ჩემი ცოდვით.
-ნუ ჩამაყოლე ქალო იმ მკვდარს საფლავში. დედა! . .
-სი მინ დინგოუნუანს დო მუ რვილუნს სი ოჩოკოჩი სი?(7)
-ძალიან დიდ ბოდიშს ვიხდი, რომ არ მოვკვდი, რა ვქნა ახლა მეტი.
ძალიან რცხვენოდა თავისი ცოლის. იცოდა რომ მართალი იყო და ხმას ვერ იღებდა. ცოლის ბიძაშვილი გარდაიცვალა, რომელიც აქვე, რამდენიმე სახლის იქით ცხოვრობდა, მაგრამ მისი ცოლი სამძიმარზე ვერ მიდიოდა, იმიტომ რომ ფეხსაცმელი არა ჰქონდა. ერთადერთი, წითელი, ლურჯი – ზოლ გაყოლილი ჩუსტებით კი მისასამძიმრებლად ვერაფრით წავიდოდა. გია გამწარებული ფიქრობდა სად და როგორ ეშოვა ფეხსაცმელი და ვერაფერი მოეფიქრებინა.
გია ეზუხბაია, საკმაოდ გვიან ჩაერთო ამ ომში. გალის რაიონიდან თითქოს `შორს~, სოხუმში, გუმისთაზე ვითარდებოდა მთავარი მოვლენები. თავიდან ვერც აღიქვამდა, რომ ომი მასაც ეხებოდა. თბილისელები ახლა აფხაზებს შეუვარდნენ საქმის გასარჩევად და ეს მათი გასარკვევი იყო, მათი პრობლემები. მითუმეტეს, რომ ეზუხბაია, ისევე როგორც მეგრელთა უმრავლესობა, კარგი თვალით არ უყურებდა ე.წ. სახელმწიფო საბჭოს შენაერთებს, განსაკუთრებით იმ ამბების შემდეგ, რაც იქვე მეზობლად, ზუგდიდისა და წალენჯიხის რაიონებში დატრიალდა. გალსა და აფხაზეთს შემოფარებული პირველი პრეზიდენტის, ზვიად გამსახურდიას ერთგული სამხედროები და მომხრეები, ლეგენდებს ჰყვებოდნენ, “პუტჩისტების” და თბილისის სამხედრო საბჭოს “ხუნტის” სისასტიკეზე. მოყოლაც არ იყო საჭირო, ეზუხბაიას მშობლიური სოფელი ნაბაკევი, სულ რამდენიმე კილომეტრით იყო მოშორებული ენგურიდან და გამაყრუებელი  სროლის ხმაც კარგად ისმოდა ენგურის გაღმიდან და ცაში ავარდნილ ცეცხლის ალსაც კარგად ხედავდნენ. ასე რომ, თუ თბილისელები სამეგრელოს შემდეგ აფხაზეთშიც შევიდნენ, ეს გია ეზუხბაიას მაინცდამაინც არ გაჰკვირვებია და დიდადაც არ უნაღვლია. არც სამთავრობო ჯარებს თვლიდა თავისად და მითუმეტეს არც აფხაზებს – მათთან დაპირისპირებაც კარგად ახსოვდა, 1989 წელს ზაფხულში, როდესაც სხვებთან ერთად, თვითონაც მიაწყდა ღალიძგის ხიდს ორლულიანი  თოფით, მას შემდეგ რაც აფხაზებმა, მისაღები გამოცდების დროს, სოხუმის ქართული უნივერსიტეტი დაარბიეს. ქართველი მწერლების ფოტოები ქუჩებში გამოყარეს და ვოვა ვეკუა და კიდევ რამდენიმე სოხუმელი მოკლეს. მერე თითქოს ყველაფერი ჩაწყნარდა, აფხაზებთან მეგობრობდა, პირადად თვითონ აფხაზთან არასოდეს არაფერი ჰქონია გასაყოფი. 1991 წლის დეკემბრის სამოქალაქო ომიდან მოყოლებული კი როცა კვლავ სროლა და სისხლისღვრა დაიწყო, თბილისში დაწყებულმა სამოქალაქო დაპირისპირებამ, ეგრევე აფხაზეთში გამოსცა ექო. ქართველების შიდა ბრძოლაში, აფხაზები მაქსიმალურად ცდილობდნენ ნეიტრალიტეტის დაცვას, მაგრამ 1992 წლის აგვისტოში ომი მაინც დაიწყო. გია ეზუხბაია ამ დროს უკვე ორმოცდარვა წლის იყო და ყველაფერი ნანახი ჰქონდა, ამიტომ არცერთ მხარეს არ ენდობოდა. ამ ორომტრიალსა და ცეცხლის წვაში, უფროს ძმასთან და ბიძაშვილებთან ერთად თავისი სახლ-კარის, მანდარინის, თხილის პლანტაციებისა და ქონების დაცვას ცდილობდა, რასაც ასე თუ ისე, ხან ეშმაკობით, ხან ძალით ახერხებდა კიდევაც. მეტი არც არაფერში ერეოდა.
პირველად 1993 წლის 14-16 მარტს უყო გულმა რეჩხი, როდესაც რუსები, სომხები, აფხაზები და ჩრდილოეთ კავკასიელები, სოხუმის გარეუბანში შეიჭრნენ და რუსულმა ავიაციამ რამდენჯერმე დაბომბა სოხუმი. სოხუმიდან ლტოლვილები დაიძრნენ და გალშიც უფრო წინდახედულებმა ბარგის ჩალაგება დაიწყეს. თუმცა მაშინ ქართველებმა მაგრად იომეს და სოხუმი გადარჩა. ამის შემდეგ ცოტა ხანში ეზუხბაიებიც ჩაერთვნენ ომში.
ეს ამბავი ასე მოხდა. გია ეზუხბაიას ბავშვობის ძმაკაცი და კლასელი დათო შერვაშიძე რიგიდან ჩამოვიდა, თავისი ძველი მეგობრის, ფრიდონ მარშანიას დასაფლავებაზე. ფრიდონ მარშანია მხედრიონთან მოძრაობდა და პირველივე დღიდან ომობდა. მარშანია ოჩამჩირესთან მოკლეს, Oოჩამჩირე-სოხუმის გზის გახსნის ოპერაციისას. ფრიდონ მარშანია და დათო შერვაშიძე სხვა ამბებიდან იყვნენ ერთად, გია ეზუხბაია გლეხი იყო, თავისი მანდარინებით, თხილით და საქონლით. შერვაშიძე და მარშანია კი ბავშვობიდან განაბებთან დარბოდნენ, მოსკოვი, როსტოვი, შავები, წამალი და ეგრე. . . მერე დათო რიგაში დარჩა თავისი ოჯახით, საქმეებს მიჰხედა და კარგა ხანი, ომის დაწყების შემდეგაც აღარ გამოუხედავს საქართველოსკენ. ახლა კი დაღუპული ძმაკაცის დასატირებლად ჩამოფრინდა რიგიდან. ძლივს ჩამოაღწია თბილისიდან ილორამდე, სადაც მარშანიების დიდ, ორსართულიან სახლში დაცხრილული ფრიდონ მარშანია იწვა და ქალების ცაში წასული კივილი აღარ ესმოდა.
ეზუხბაიები ორი მანქანით ჩავიდნენ ილორში, მაშინ მანქანით მოძრაობა ძალიან სახიფათო იყო. ნაბაკევიდან ილორამდე სამჯერ გააჩერეს, მაგრამ როგორც კი იგებდნენ სად მიდიოდნენ უპრობლემოდ უშვებდნენ.
გია ეზუხბაიას და მის უფროს ძმას, ეზოში მოტრიალე კაცები შეეგებნენ, ეზუხბაიები და დათო შერვაშიძე კი განსაკუთრებულად შეხვდნენ ერთმანეთს. დიდხანს იდგნენ ერთმანეთს გადახვეულები, გია ჩუმად იწმენდდა ცრემლებს და დათოს გათიშულ სახეში ჩაჰყურებდა.
– დათო ჯიმაია, მუჭორექ, ჯიმა ა? სად და რა დღეში ვხვდებით ერთმანეთს თუ ხედავ ა? ვავა ჯიმაია, ვავა დიდაშ ფხოდ მა. . .
– მამუ ვიიბუ ვსემ, ბლიადი, კაზლი, სუკი პაზორნიე, პიდარასტი ბლიად, კროვიუ უ მენია ხარკაც ბუდუტ.
– რას გააწყობ, დათო, როგორ გინდა რომ ქნა და რა უნდა ქნა, სულ ახვრებია აქედან და იქიდან. . .
– როგორ მომიკლეს ჩემი ფრიდონა მარშანია, როგორ დამიბრიდეს ტყვილა ბოზებმა. . .
– რაც მე მაგას ვუშალე, რა გინდა-თქვა, რას ერევი-თქვა, ისინიც დედას. . . ესენიც, ორივე ჩვენზე მოდის და შენ ვისთვის უნდა მოიკლა თავი-თქვა. Aარაა, მაგ ჩვენი საჩხუბი-თქვა ვუთხარი, მოვლიან ეს შაკალი პოლიტიკოსები, გადაგვამტერებენ, ჩაგვახოციებენ ერთმანეთს, წავლენ მერე მისი გზით და ჩვენ მოსისხლეებად უნდა ვიყოთ მერე სულ, ამათი პოლიტიკისა და გაუმაძღარი მუცლის გამო.  უბრალო ხალხი უნდა გავიჭყლიტოთ ისევ-თქვა, მაგრამ ვინ დაგიჯერა, შეასმენდი რამეს? არა, ძმები არიანო. რაის ძმები, სასწაულები აკეთეს სამეგრელოში აგერ. და აბა აფხაზი ვინაა? Mმე ლიჩნა სულ არაფერი საომარი არ მაქვს აფხაზთან! სულ ნათესავები და მოგვარეები არიან მაგ ოხრებიც!
გია ეზუხბაიას და დათო შერვაშიძეს ერთმანეთი წლების განმავლობაში არ ჰყავდათ ნანახი და, როგორც ეს ჩვეულებრივ ხდება, მთელი სამძიმარი ერთმანეთს აღარ მოშორებიან. სვამდნენ, დათო მოზომილად იკეთებდა, ჩუმად ტიროდა, სათვალის  შავი შუშიდან ეპარებოდა ცრემლი, გიას აქაურ ამბებს ეკითხებოდა, მერე ავიწყდებოდა და აღარ უსმენდა, გია ეზუხბაიას მეგრულ ჩხუბსა და გინებას.
– ბავშვები როგორ არიან? მეუღლე რას შვრება? – ჰკითხა ერთხელ ჩუმად გიას როცა, ფრიდონ მარშანიას ღამეს უთევდნენ და გიას უფროსი ძმისშვილი 90-ე ფსალმუნს უკითხავდა გარდაცვლილს.
– არის, რა ვიცი. როგორ უნდა იყოს, გვიძლებს.
– ორი ბიჭი გყავს და გოგო ხომ?
– ორი ბიჭი მყავს და ორი გოგო. ორივე ბიჭს დათო დავარქვი შენს საპატივსაცემოდ.
– მოიცა, როგორ კაცო, ძმებს ერთი სახელი რანაირად დაარქვი?
– ერთს დათოს ვეძახი და მეორეს დათას.
– შენ რა გითხარი მე! – დათო შერვაშიძეს მთელი  ამ დღეების განმავლობაში პირველად გაეცინა.
დასაფლავებიდან მეორე დღეს, დათო შერვაშიძე, გია ეზუხბაიასთან მივიდა, თავის სეხნიებს საჩუქრები მიუტანა. ეზუხბაიებმა სუფრა გაშალეს. დათო შერვაშიძე მთელი სუფრა ჩუმად იყო, რამდენჯერმე წააკიმარა კიდევაც, მაგრამ რაღაცის სათქმელი იყო ეს სიჩუმე. ისევ გიამ დაიწყო.
– როდის ბრუნდები, დათო, პრიბალტიკაში უკან, გაგაცილებთ. გაცილება გინდა შენ, ისე არ ივარგებს. ძალიან ცუდი დროა ახლა აქ. ა!
გარედან ყრუდ, მაგრამ განუწყვეტლივ ისმოდა სროლის ხმა.
დათო შერვაშიძემ დიდი გელათური ჭიქით დალია, 45 გრადუსიანი ჭაჭის არაყი, გამოფხიზლდა და თქვა:
– არსად არ მივდივარ აქედან მე! . .
გიას უფროსი ძმა მიხვდა და ჩუმად დაიქნია თავი.
– მოიცა აბა რას შვრები? რა დაგრჩენია ამ ჯანდაბაში? არ გადამრიო ახლა შენ, ხომ არ გაგიჟდი? ე, ცხონებული ფრიდონა მარშანია, არ დამიჯერა არაფერი იმანაც და კი წევს მიწაში, გაუნათლოს სული ღმერთმა. ვერ ხედავ რა ხდება ამ დედაატირებულში? Aაქ რა დაგრჩენია ამ ჯანდაბაში, ბლიად?.. ე ბიჭო, წასასვლელი მქონდეს სადმე შენსავით და აქაურობას არ…
– ფრიდონა ვის დავუტოვო? შენ ვისთან დაგტოვო? და რა ვაკეთო მერე რიგაში? ვიგულაო? გავარტყი აწი პრიბალტიკას, ჩემი რა არის იქ? ჩემი ძმა მიწაში დავტოვო, აბაროტის გარეშე გავწირო და გავიქცე? სად გავიქცე, გია? ვის გავექცე? ამ კრისებს და ბოზებს გავექცე მე? როგორ გავიქცე? და თქვენ დაგტოვოთ აქ ასე, ხომ? და მერე რას იტყვი, მაგას თუ ვიზამ მაშინ, ა?  მაგარი კაცია დათო შერვაშიძე, მასე უნდა, სწორედ იქცევაო? ა? შემაგინებ!
– არ შეგაგინებ! ოღონდ შენ წადი, კარგად იყავი იქ და, ა ოთხივე შვილს ვფიცავარ თუ შეგაგინო! ჯიმაიას გეფიცები აგერ უფროსს. . .
– აჰ, არა, შენ მაგას როგორ იზამ, როგორ შეიგინები. კაროჩე ვრჩები და გადაწყვეტილია ეს. ჩემი წასვლა გაქცევაა ახლა. არასოდეს არ გავქცეულვარ მე, იცი შენ ეს.
– და ცოლშვილი? ოჯახს რას უშვრები? რიგაში ტოვებ ასე თუ როგორ იქნება?
– არაფერი არ უჭირთ იმათ. აბა შენები როგორ არიან აქ? თუ შენი ბავშვები ბავშვები არ არიან და შენი ოჯახი  ოჯახი არ არის, ამ ჯოჯოხეთს რომ უძლებენ? გაძლონ იმათაც რიგაში. . .
გია შეშფოთებული უყურებდა ბავშვობის ძმაკაცს.
– კარგი,  გასაგებია ეგ ყველაფერი და ახლა რას ვაპირებთ, დათო? – ჰკითხა გიას უფროსმა ძმამ.
– მარშანიას ძმებს ველაპარაკე იქ, მხედრიონში. ვრჩები-თქვა ვუთხარი. – ყველაფერში დაგვეხმარებიან.
– არ ვარგა ეგ, არ მომწონს მაგ ამბავი, მხედრიონთან ყოფნა. ვერ გაგვიგებენ. ხალხიც ვერ გაგვიგებს დათო მაგას. . .
– ხალხი არა ის კიდო! რაც ხალხია ისაა მხედრიონიც, რა გინდა შენ მხედრიონისგან, რას ერჩი მხედრიონს, იგივე ხალხი მიდის იმ მხედრიონში, აბა რა გგონია შენ. ციდან კი არ ჩამოცვენილან ეგენი, ჩვენები არიან ისევ.  ხალხმა მოიყვანა მაგ მხედრიონი, ერთმანეთს ასწრებდნენ მაგენთან მირბენას და დაბეზღებას, ვის რამდენი ფარა ჰქონდა სახლში და ვის ვისი ჯინი სჭირდა. ზუსტად ვიცი მაგ მე. Fფუჰ, ზასრანცი ბლიად! . .
– მაგ უბედურება შენზე მეტიც ვიცოდე იქნება, მაგრამ სულ ერთია არ წამოვალ მაგენთან მე, არ მომწონს მაგ ხალხი! _ თქვა გია ეზუხბაიამ.
A   – კარგი ბატონო, არა და არ ვიქნებით მხედრიონთან. ეგენი უბრალოდ იარაღს მოგვაშველებენ. ცალკე ვიქნებით. გალის ბატალიონი გვერქმევა ან რა ვიცი, რა მნიშვნელობა აქვს მაგას.
– არაფერი – დაეთანხმა გია ეზუხბაია. შეფიქრიანებული იყო.
– იარაღი გაქვთ?
– კი. იარაღი როგორ არა გვაქვს – თქვა გია ეზუხბაიამ და განჯინას მიყრდნობილ, გადაფითრებულ და პირზეხელაფარებულ ცოლს თვალი აარიდა.
– ხვალ, 10 საათზე გალში ვიკრიბებით. იქაც დაგვხვდება იარაღი. იარაღზე პრობლემა არ იქნება. იმის ლაპარაკი რომ მოხვალთ, არ მოხვალთ, მაინც ძმები ხართ სიკვდილამდე, არ მინდა აქ მე.
გია ეზუხბაიას უფროსი ძმა ჩუმად  იჯდა. უკვე გადაწყვეტილი ჰქონდა.
–  გადაშენდი იქით! – ჩამწყდარი ხმით თქვა გია ეზუხბაიამ.
– წავედი აბა მე და დიდი მადლობა ყველაფრისთვის. დიასახლისებთან ბოდიში, შეგაწუხეთ ნამეტანი. ს ბოგამ.
გაცილების დროს, ჭიშკართან, ერთმანეთი გადაკოცნეს.
–  თენეფიშ დიდა ფხოდი მა, მუჭო ქინომინჯირუეს ჩქიმი ფრიდონა მარშანია უჩა დიხაშა, თუ ბოზებ თენეფიში დიდა ფხოდი არძოში(8) – თქვა გათიშულმა დათო შერვაშიძემ, მანქანაში ჩაჯდა და ზუილით დაძრა. კარგა ხანს დახტოდა მთელი სისწრაფით წასული მანქანის ფარების შუქი სიბნელეში, ათხრილ გზაზე ორმოებში რახუნისაგან.
დილის ათ საათზე გალში შეიკრიბნენ. დათო შერვაშიძე თერთმეტზე მოვიდა, თვალებს ძლივს ახელდა. და დაიწყო. ძირითადად ოჩამჩირეში იბრძოდნენ: კოჩარა, ცაგერა, კინდღი, ტამიში, წებელდა, ლაბრა. კოჩარასთან პირველ ბრძოლაში, გია ეზუხბაიამ თავი ვერ აწია მაღლა. იმ გრუხუნში და დაგადუგში ძალიან დაიბნა. `ახლა გადავრჩე ღმერთო და აქეთ მომბრუნებელი აღარა ვარო~, ფიქრობდა ტალახიან მიწაში თავჩარგული და მწვანე ბალახის  ღერებს თვალს არ აშორებდა. უფროსმა ძმამ მოირბინა – `რა გჭირს დაჭრილი ხომ არ ხარო?~- გადაფითრებულმა გიამ მხოლოდ თავის გაქნევა მოახერხა – `არაო~. – `ისროლე აწი, სირცხვილია~- უთხრა ძმამ ჩუმად და მერე წელში მოხრილი სირბილით დაბრუნდა თავის ადგილას – მიტოვებული, გამოშიგნული ფერმის, ნაცრისფერ, ბათქაშაყრილ კედელთან ჩაჯდა და დასცხო. გია ხედავდა ძმის ხელში აცახცახებული ავტომატის ლულიდან გამომკრთალ, წითელ-ყვითელ ალს. ძმას მშვიდი სახე ჰქონდა, ნაწყვეტ-ნაწყვეტ უშვებდა ჯერს. დამიზნებით ისროდა. `მაგარია ჯიმა, მაგ ოხერი, ყოველთვის მაგარი იყო… Aაუუ, როდის მორჩება ეს ყველაფერი და როდის დაღამდება! ვაავა, დათო შერვაშიძე, სკან ჯგირ ფხოდ მა, აქ სად წამომათრიე და რა დღეში ჩამაგდე.  დედა რა უბედურებაა ეს! ახლა გადამარჩინე, ღმერთო, და აქით მომბრუნებულის დედა… კიდო.  რა ჩემი საქმე იყო ომი და სროლა და რას ვერეოდი ამ ხოცვა-ჟლეტაში? რომელი გენერალი მე ვარ, მე უბედური ა?” მერე თავსზემოთ ასწია ავტომატი და სასხლეტს დააწვა.  იმ გრიალშიც კი ყური მოსჭრა საკუთარი ავტომატის მჭახე, გამაყრუებელმა ხმამ. ავტომატიდან გადმოცვენილი, გახურებული გილზები, ცივი წკრიალით მიეყარნენ ერთმანეთს. `აუ, როდის დამთავრდება ეს ოხერი დაღამდეს მაინც ნეტავი.~. . მზე მთელი ძალით კაშკაშებდა და იმ დღემ, დაღამებამდე ბევრი სიცოცხლე წაიღო.
საღამოს, ყველაფერი რომ დამთავრდა და ერთად შეიკრიბნენ, გია ძალიან დარცხვენილი იყო. განსაკუთრებით, ახალგაზრდა თბილისელი ბიჭების შერცხვა, რომლებიც არხეინად იკრიჭებოდნენ და მოსაწევის დათრევაზე და აქაური პლანის ავ-კარგიანობაზე ეთათბირებოდნენ ადგილობრივებს. – `ჩემი ხნის კაცი რომ თოხს და ბარს გადააგდებს და თოფს მოკიდებს ხელს, არ გამოვა იმისგან არაფერი~-თქვა ხმამაღლა. თბილისელმა ბიჭებმა შემწყნარებლურად და ცოტა ირონიულადაც გაიღიმეს. – `ეგ არაფერი ბიძაჩემო, თავიდან ყველანი ვიფსამთ, პირველად ეგრეა.~. . უთხრა თბილისელებიდან ყველაზე უმცროსმა, პირტიტველა ბიჭმა, რომელიც გიას ძმისშვილზე უფროსი არ იქნებოდა. `ა, შეხედე ახლა, ამ მართლა ქვეშასფიას დასაცავი რომ შეიქნები კაცი. . . აღარ უნდა წავხდე, თვარა დამცინებენ ეს მამაძაღლები.~
–  ამ უბედურებას რომ მოვრჩებით, კაი მაგარი პლანი ჩემზე იყოს, ოტობაიას პლანი!
– მაგარია? – თვალები გაუბრწყინდა ყველაზე პატარას.
უფროსი ეზუხბაია ხის ძირში იჯდა, როგორც ყოველთვის ჩუმად და ჩაფიქრებული. გიას სიტყვებზე უკმაყოფილოდ გაიქნია თავი.
–  ნამეტანს შვრები იცოდე, დათო, არ ვარგა მასე, არ გინდა! – უთხრა  შერვაშიძეს.
დათო შერვაშიძე ჩუმად იჯდა ვიღაცის ზურგჩანთაზე, ოფლში გაწუწული და ძლივს სუნთქავდა.
`სდია ტყვიას სირბილით ამ შეჩვენებულმა~- გაიფიქრა  გია ეზუხბაიამ – ` კაცზეა, თვარა დათო და ჯიმაც პირველად იყვნენ, მაგრამ იომეს მაგრად.~
–  ფრიდონა ყველას ძმა იყო და ყველას მაგრად გვიყვარდა, მაგრამ სიფრთხილით უნდა ყველაფერს გაკეთება და ჭკუით. მარტო გულით არ გამოდის საქმე, მარტო გულით ე, ესაა რაც ხდება _ უთხრა დათოს უფროსმა ეზუხბაიამ.
–  არ უნდა გარეულიყო, ამ ჩათლახობაში, დაიწყებენ ეს გოთვერნები სადღაც კაბინეტში ბოზობას და მერე კაი ბიჭები იხოცებიან ორივე მხარეს, იქ სათავეში არ მოუვათ არაფერი.  ჩვენი სიკვდილი რას ენაღვლებათ მაგათ, იქით წაადგეთ იქნება. არ უნდა გარეულიყო. აქ რომ ვყოფილიყავი დავუშლიდი, მაგრამ ახლა რაღას ეტყვი, წევს დაბრედილი, გვიანია უკვე. . . – თქვა დათო შერვაშიძემ, რაღაცნაირი შეცვლილი ხიხინა ხმით. მერე გულის ჯიბეში ხელი ჩაიყო, ოთხად გაკეცილი ვერცხლის ქაღალდი ამოიღო და თბილისელებისაკენ მოაბრუნა შავი სათვალე.
– ე, ეგერ არის, მაგრამ ფრთხილად ქენით, ნაფაზიანია და ნამეტანი არ მოგივიდეთ.
თბილისელებიდან ყველაზე უმცროსი ნელა, დაყენებული ნაბიჯით მიუახლოვდა და გამოართვა.
–  გმადლობთ. თქვენ?
–  არ ვეწევი მაგას მე. . .
– მიგეწვდინა, დათო, იქით, ეგება, ხმა – ხომ გყავს აფხაზებში, კაი პატიოსანი, ჭკვა მოსაკითხი ხალხი. გავათავოთ იქნება ეს გლახა ამბავი. . .
დათო შერვაშიძემ სიგარეტი ამოიღო და მოუკიდა.
–  აღარ დამთავრდება აწი ეს! . . – თქვა მერე. – სლავიკა კაპში მოკლეს უკვე. გაგრაში ქართველ მღვდელს გამოესარჩლა,  პაკრიშკა გადააცვეს რუსის კაზაკებმა და წვავდნენ. გადაეფარა იმ მღვდელს კაპში – რას შვრებით თქვე ბოზებოო, ასე უიარაღო, შიშველი გულით გადაეფარა. ზედ დააკლეს კაზაკებმა იმ ქართველ მღვდელს სლავიკა კაპში  და ორივე ერთად დაწვეს მაინც. ჩვენიანებმა – აფხაზებმა მოვძებნით იმ კაზაკებსო. სად მოძებნი მაგ მათხოვრებს, ჯიში მაგათ არა აქვთ, მოდგმა, სახლი და ჩესტი. ბესო აგრბა კიდევ იქიდან ომობს, ბიძაშვილი ჩაუწვეს ტანკში გუმისთასთან ქართველებმა და აბაროტს იღებს. დიმა არღუნს ბიძა მოუკლეს გაგრაში, ალალი დედისძმა და ისიც ჩვენ გვეომება. ჩვენი მებონია-“სოხუმსკი”, ტატაშ ჩხოტუა და დათო გერძმავა თავიდანვე გაერიდნენ. რუსეთში არიან, მოსკოვში. რამდენჯერმე დამირეკეს, ჩამოსვლას აპირებდნენ ჩემთან რიგაში. კიდეა ხალხი, მაგრამ ვერ წყვეტენ, ვეგნმაჭყვიდენა, ვარა მუს გინოჭყვიდუნა, ვარა მი უჩქიდე თინეფიშ ნარაგადუს, თე ბესპრედელშჩიკ დიდა ფხოდი (9). გადაწყვეტილი და გაყიდულია უკვე ყველაფერი.
გია ეზუხბაია ჩუმად უსმენდათ. ამ ლაპარაკზე კიდევ უფრო გაუცივდა სხეული. მთელი ძალით უჭერდა ავტომატს ხელს და ცდილობდა შიშით დაცარიელებული გულისათვის ყურადღება არ მიექცია.
–  ნეტა ჩვენთან რა ხდება იქ, როგორ არიან სახლში? – ჰკითხა უფროს ძმას.
გიას უფროსმა ძმამ, ჩუმად აიჩეჩა მხრები და გვერდზე გაიხედა.
მეორე Dდღეს, დილით ადრე, შერვაშიძემ წამალი გაიკეთა, მერე გზაჯვარედინზე დიდ ონკანთან გამოვიდნენ ხელ-პირის დასაბანად. E
– ეჰ, ნეტავი რა ხდება ჩვენთან სახლში, ჯიმაია, ა? როგორ არიან და რას შვრებიან ჩვენები? Nნერვიულობენ და დარდობენ ალბათ ძალიან. _ გაიმეორა ისევ გუშინდელი გია ეზუხბაიამ.
– რა გააჭირე, წიე, შენ საქმე ამ სახლით, რა ვიცი მე, რა ხდება, ან აქ ვისი სახლია ნეტავი? _ გამწარებული აყვირდა მოულოდნელად უფროსი ეზუხბაია.
– რა გაყვირებს თუ იცი შენ? ოხ! ვინაა ეს უჟმური!
უცებ გააფთრებული სროლის ხმა გაისმა. სროლის ხმა ძალიან სწრაფად მოახლოვდა.
სოფელს შემოუტიეს. მებრძოლები არეულად გაიშალნენ, რომ დროულად დაეკავებინათ შედარებით უსაფრთხო, ტაქტიკურად სწორი და უფრო მომგებიანი პოზიცია. მხოლოდ დათო შერვაშიძე დადიოდა  ნაბიჯით, უფრო იმიტომ, რომ სირბილის თავი არა ჰქონდა. G
გია ეზუხბაია, ბათუმელ შუქრია დიასამიძესთან ერთად სწრაფად შევარდა პირველივე ეზოში და მიტოვებული ფანჯრებჩალეწილი სახლის კუთხეში ჩასაფრდა. იქვე სამზადთან ჩაჯდა შუქრია დიასამიძე.
– ჩემებისთვის ხომ არ მოგიკრავს თვალი საით არიან? _ ყვირილით იკითხა გადაფითრებულმა გია ეზუხბაიამ, თან აქეთ-იქით იყურებოდა. თავის ძმას და დათო შერვაშიძეს ეძებდა.
კითხვა შუქრია დიასამიძის ავტომატის ხმაში დაიკარგა. დიასამიძემ ჯერი მიუშვა, მაგრამ გამოზომილად ისროდა. Gგია ეზუხბაია სათითაოთ ურტყამდა   ეზოს ბოლოსკენ.
ცოტა ხნის შემდეგ დიასამიძეს, მკერდის მარჯვენა მხარეს, ოთხი ტყვიის ჯერმა გადაუარა. მეოთხე ტყვიამ მხარზე გაჰკრა. გიამ უცებ მიირბინა,  იქვე ჩაჯდა და გაოგნებული დააშტერდა შუქრიას აცახცახებულ სახეს, პირზე მომდგარ ვარდისფერი სისხლის ბუშტუკებს – ერთმა ტყვიამ ფილტვში გაუარა. გიამ პირველად ნახა ტყვიით მკვდარი კაცი და თვალებს არ უჯერებდა როდესაც ხედავდა, უკვე მკვდარი შუქრია დიასამიძე, კიდევ რამდენიმე წამი როგორ ექაჩებოდა ავტომატის Gღვედს და როგორ შლიდა და კრუნჩხავდა მარჯვენა ხელის თითებს.
გია ეზუხბაიას თითქოს რაღაც მოეხსნა. შუქრია დიასამიძესთან ჩამჯდარი ადგა, ფრთხილად აარიდა ფეხი უცებ გადიდებულ სისხლის გუბეს, მთელი ტანით გაიმართა, ავტომატის კონდახი მხარზე მიიბჯინა და მთელი მჭიდი გაუშვა ბაღჩის ბოლოსკენ, მერე ეგრევე ფეხზე მდგარმა გამოცვალა მჭიდი და ისევ დასცხო. ესმოდა გვერდით ჩაწუილებული ტყვიების დამახასიათებელი წასტვენის ხმა, რომელიც ჯერ კიდევ გუშინ ძარღვებში სისხლს უყინავდა, მაგრამ ახლა აღარ მოქმედებდა. აღარ მოქმედებდა და მორჩა. თავი ვერ დააწევინა, ვერც იქვე შორიახლოს აფეთქებული ნაღმსატყორცნის ჭურვის აფეთქებამ, ვერც  ზედ გადმოყრილმა მიწამ, ვერც სულ უფრო და უფრო მოხშირებულმა, ჩაცდენილი ტყვიების, ზედიზედ წამოსულმა სტვენამ.
ეზოსთან ჭიშკრის მხარეს, ტორმუზების ჭყრიალით გაჩერდა `ვილისი.~ იქიდან გადმოსულებმა შუქრია დიასამიძე  მანქანისკენ წაიღეს.
_აზრი აღარა აქ დაბრედილია! -გაისმა ხმა.
შუქრია დიასამიძის ცხედარი ფრთხილად დაასვენეს გზის პირას.
-სან სანიჩს დაუკავშირდი რაციით, ბარტავოი გაზიკით გამოვიდეს! –
თქვა ერთერთმა და გიასკენ გაიქცა წელში მოხრილი.
ცოტა ხანში  სხვებიც შემოცვივდნენ ეზოში, მათ შორის უფროსი ეზუხბაია და დათო შერვაშიძეც, ხეების ძირში ჩასხდნენ. დათო შერვაშიძე რამდენჯერმე წამოვარდა. ეზუხბაიებმა  გინებით  და ყვირილით გააჩერეს, მაგრამ უკვე გვიან იყო. შერვაშიძე წაიქცა. გაუმართლა. ტყვიამ გვერდში გაუარა.
Oორივე ეზუხბაია დათო შერვაშიძეს მივარდა.
-ა, დეინახე რა გააკეთა ეს, მაინც თავისი გაიტანა. Aარ ხარ შენ ნორმალური ბოზისქუა ვორექ მა!
– გამოდი, გამოიყვანე რას შვრება ეს ჩემისა, მართლა არაა ეს მთლად დალაგებული. . .
– გამიშვით ხელი არაფერი არ მჭირს. აგერ ხორცში გამიარა!
– გააჩუმე ენა თვარა, ჩემი ხელით მოგკალი ახლა! ხორცში გაუარა ბლიად!
დათო შერვაშიძე იქვე მდგარ ,,ვილისში’’  ძალით ჩატენეს.
– წაიყვანეთ მოაშორეთ აქედან! ვინაა ეს გადარეული, გაზიზინდება თვითონ დილაადრიანა, ვერ გრძნობს ვეღარაფერს და უნდა ინერვიულო შენ! . .
დღის ბოლოს  დენთის სუნით გაჯერებული გია ეზუხბაია ხის ძირში იჯდა, ზედიზედ ეწეოდა სიგარეტს და ბათუმელი შუქრია დიასამიძის სისხლი ახსენდებოდა. თვითონ შუქრია იმდენად არა, წინა საღამოს გაიცნო, მალევე დაიძინეს და დილიდან ბრძოლაში ჩაერთვნენ. ორი სიტყვის თქმაც ვერ მოასწრეს ერთმანეთისთვის. შუქრია დიასამიძის სხეულის ქვეშ, ზღვასავით მოზვავებული მუქი, შინდისფერი სისხლი  კი თვალებიდან არ ამოსდიოდა და არც იმის შეგრძნება ტოვებდა, რომ ეს მისი სისხლი იყო. ამის მერე შეეჩვია. აღარ ფეთდებოდა.
შეეჩვია. სროლას შეეჩვია, მაგრამ სროლაზე უფრო მეტად, სხვა რამის შეჩვევა გაუჭირდა. ბრძოლაში ჩაბმიდან, პირველი ერთი კვირა, საერთოდ ვერ მიეკარა საჭმელს. მშიერი იყო, მაგრამ შიმშილსაც ვერ გრძნობდა. პირიქით, რომ უყურებდა ყოველი დღის ბოლოს, როგორ ერეკებოდნენ მებრძოლები, პირადპირ ქილებიდან, “ტუშონკებს”, `მალაკოს~ ან სადმე მოპარული ბურვაკის ნახევრად უმ ხორცს, სულ გული უწუხდებოდა – `რა აჭმევთ ამდენ მკვდარში, სისხლში და ცეცხლში ამ ოხრებსო~ – მაგრამ ცოტა ხანში,  ისე რომ ვერც გაიგო, თვითონაც ეგრევე ქილიდან დაიწყო, ქონში გადალესილი “ტუშონკის” ჭამა კალაშნიკოვის ხიშტით.

(1) ვინ დაგიცავს შე საწყალო, ვინაა შენი პატრონი და მადლიერი, ეგერ შენ და ეგერ შენი საქართველო, გიშველოს ახლა(მეგ)…
(2) რა იომე ერთი ამისთანა, ვის უნდოდა შენი ომი და ვის რა დააკელი ნეტავი? (მეგ.)
(3) UQხო, მაგათსავით მონებად დავუდგები კიდევ მაგ ნაბოზრებს (მეგ)
(4) პარტიზანი ვარო და ბუტკის ნისიის შიშით ქუჩაში ვერ გავსულვარ.(მეგ)
(5) ენა გააჩუმე  და ლაპარაკს მოუკელი გირჩევ მე(მეგ).
(6) შენი და შენი მორფინისტი და ყაჩაღი ძმაკაცების გარდა. (მეგ)
(7) შენ  ვინ ჩაგაყოლებს და რა მოგკლავს შე ოჩოკოჩო შენ (მეგ).
(8) ამათი დედა. . . , როგორ ჩამიწვინეს ჩემი ფრიდონა მარშანია მიწაში ამ ბოზებმა – ამათი დედა . . . ყველასი. (მეგ)
(9) რას გადაწყვეტენ, ვინ მოუსმენს მაგათ სიტყვას, ამათი ბესპრედელჩიკი დედა . . .(მეგ)

 

Read Next

[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]