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Nonfiction

Who Translates?

The charged and complex topic of who gets to translate has been much discussed lately.

In the wake of 2020’s racist violence, and subsequent organizing by the Black Lives Matter movement and others to combat white supremacy, literary magazines and publishers everywhere have, to differing degrees, made efforts to publish more writers of color. Within the translation community, a corresponding issue arises: Who is chosen to translate, and what assumptions and structures support and drive those decisions? What roles do race and privilege play? And how can we assure equal access to all?

South Korea-based translator from Korean Anton Hur, US-based scholar and translator from French and Czech Corine Tachtiris, and Canada-based writer and translator from Chinese Yilin Wang consider this complex topic.

The Great White Canceling
by Anton Hur
Privilege, Race, and Translation
by Corine Tachtiris
Barriers, Privileges, and Invisible Labor: A Sino Diaspora Translator’s Perspective
by Yilin Wang

 

And read previous roundtables:

Can International Literature Make Us Better Travelers?

How Can We Better Publish Black Writers in Translation?

Do Comp Titles Do More Harm Than Good?

English

In the wake of 2020’s racist violence, and subsequent organizing by the Black Lives Matter movement and others to combat white supremacy, literary magazines and publishers everywhere have, to differing degrees, made efforts to publish more writers of color. Within the translation community, a corresponding issue arises: Who is chosen to translate, and what assumptions and structures support and drive those decisions? What roles do race and privilege play? And how can we assure equal access to all?

South Korea-based translator from Korean Anton Hur, US-based scholar and translator from French and Czech Corine Tachtiris, and Canada-based writer and translator from Chinese Yilin Wang consider this complex topic.

The Great White Canceling
by Anton Hur
Privilege, Race, and Translation
by Corine Tachtiris
Barriers, Privileges, and Invisible Labor: A Sino Diaspora Translator’s Perspective
by Yilin Wang

 

And read previous roundtables:

Can International Literature Make Us Better Travelers?

How Can We Better Publish Black Writers in Translation?

Do Comp Titles Do More Harm Than Good?

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