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Contributor

Paul Curtis Daw

Contributor

Paul Curtis Daw

Paul Curtis Daw is a lawyer-turned-translator. His translation of Evelyne Trouillot’s novel, Memory at Bay, is published by the University of Virginia Press. His translation of Olivier Targowla’s novel, Narcisse on a Tightrope, is forthcoming from Deep Vellum’s Dalkey Archive imprint, and Akashic Books will soon publish several of his story translations in Paris Noir: The Suburbs. His renditions of stories and other texts from France, Haiti, Belgium, Quebec, Reunion, and Swiss Romandy appear in Words Without Borders, Subtropics, Asymptote Blog, Indiana Review, Cimarron Review, and Massachusetts Review (forthcoming), among other publications, and in four annual editions of Best European Fiction. He is a former officer and director of the American Literary Translators Association.

Articles by Paul Curtis Daw

Respecting the Diversity of Creativity
By Évelyne Trouillot
It would be naive to speak of editorial decisions without taking into account power relationships and established patterns of prejudice that undergird the publishing industry.
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
from “My Body Laid Bare”
By Stéphane Lambert
Thankfully, the advent of my friends’ sexuality took me out of the lonely guilt I felt after being molested. The first year of middle school is the occasion for young studs to swagger onto the scene.…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
Detour
By Évelyne Trouillot
Trouillot’s most striking childhood memories of the Duvalier dictatorship remain the image of Duvalier’s militiamen searching her family’s and neighbor’s houses for publications and other works of art deemed subversive.”—Edwidge Danticat
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
Multilingual
Primal Needs
By Évelyne Trouillot
They arrived together, a pair of butterflies with green and yellow wings, dappled and tremulous. They landed here and there on the hibiscus blooms surrounding the pool, and the youth marveled at their…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
Multilingual
The Iron Caterpillar
By J. William Cally
Strange phenomena can strike such dread into human hearts that I ask you to believe in the one that knotted the stomach of the young diver named Paolo, who noticed the haze of the tunnel when he was returning…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
Brine, Blood, and Mother’s Milk
By Évelyne Trouillot
For the woman with bound hands, a vacant stare, and an impudent bottom, whom I glimpsed at Corail one morning during the season of stormsI’ve turned my skin inside out, but I can still feel the…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
Multilingual
Gandhi’s Admirer
By Pan Bouyoucas
Twelve till midnight. On this Saturday, March 8, he was listening to a recap of the day’s hockey games on the kitchen radio, making a cup of hot chocolate to drink while he watched the film Gandhi,…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
From the Translator: Paul Curtis Daw on Translating Vincent Mondiot
By Paul Curtis Daw
While leisurely making my way through a collection of winning entries from the 2006 French young writer’s competition, I was brought up short by “Ils viennent toujours en l’automne.” …
They Always Come in the Autumn
By Vincent Mondiot
Suzanna peered outside for the fourth time that day, and it still wasn’t quite noon. Beyond the window, the surrounding plain remained as motionless and silent as it had been when she’d last…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
The Black Marne
By Jocelyn Dupré
When she hugged me from behind and put her cold hands on my chest, my own hand holding the razor twitched. I'd thought she was at her parents', but in her haste to see me she had bolted out to…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
In the Shade of the Almond Tree
By Évelyne Trouillot
Author's Note: Two major obstacles to happiness remain constant throughout the history of Haitian society: social and economic injustice, and totalitarian tendencies. Poverty can be as cruel as dictatorship…
Translated from French by Paul Curtis Daw
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