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Contributor

Julia Sanches

Portrait of translator Julia Sanches
Copyright © Dagan Farancz
Contributor

Julia Sanches

Julia Sanches is a translator of Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Catalan. Among her book-length translations are Now and at the Hour of Our Death by Susana Moreira Marques; Permafrost by Eva Baltasar;  Slash and Burn by Claudia Hernández; and What Are the Blind Men Dreaming? by Noemi Jaffe. Her shorter translations have appeared in Suelta, the Washington Review, Asymptote, Two Lines, Granta, Tin House, Words Without Borders, and Revista Machado, among others. A former literary agent, she is cofounder of the collective Cedilla & Co.

Articles by Julia Sanches

Boulder
By Eva Baltasar
Having a kid is the same as enrolling in a lifetime plan of suffering.
Translated from Catalan by Julia Sanches
Slash and Burn
By Claudia Hernández
Salvadoran author Claudia Hernández's first novel, Slash and Burn, is out this week with And Other Stories. Translated by Julia Sanches, the book follows several women through…
Translated by Julia Sanches
Özdamar’s Tongue
By Mariana Oliver
Özdamar knew that arriving in a country with no return ticket meant voluntarily surrendering to an indeterminate foreignness.
Translated from Spanish by Julia Sanches
Sun and Slang: On Translating Geovani Martins’s “The Sun on My Head”
By Julia Sanches
I slept poorly while translating Geovani Martins’s O sol na cabeça, waking up repeatedly in the wee hours of the night, a solution to a thorny problem on the tip of my tongue, alarm…
Searching for Light
By Yao Feng
The light retires to the lamp / and suddenly all is dark again
Translated from Portuguese by Julia Sanches
The Forest of Midwives
By Eliane Brum
Sculpted from the blood of mothers and the water of children, their hands birth a piece of Brazil.
Translated from Portuguese by Julia Sanches
Fifteen Days
By Claudia Hernández
They'd take the girls to the hills for three or five days.
Translated from Spanish by Julia Sanches
From “What are the Blind Men Dreaming?”
By Noemi Jaffe
The compassionate understand pain, but pain cannot be understood; those who suffer understand nothing.
Translated from Portuguese and Serbian by Julia Sanches & Ellen Elias-Bursać
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