A New Venture

By Ana María Correa

And Other Stories is a fledgling independent publisher of fiction in translation with a new, community-based approach. Editorial selection decisions will emerge from a consensus of readers, writers, and translators.

Stefan Tobler and Jamie Searle are developing two reading forums at LibraryThing. The Portuguese-language group is looking at titles by João Paulo Cuenca, Rodrigo Lacerda, Raduan Nassar, and Dulce María Cardoso. The Spanish-language group is considering the work of Guadalupe Nettel, Andrés Neuman, Carlos Gamerro, Norma Lazo, Victoria de Stefano, and Ricardo Waale. (Incidentally, Cuenca, Nettel, and Neuman are all members of the Bogotá 39.)

The idea is for each participant to read a book or two this month, with the goal of generating discussion and debate. (They’re even sharing titles through the mail for those who are having trouble finding them.) Plans are afoot for the Portuguese-language group to meet in England in March (for those who can make it) and the Spanish-language group in April. Decisions may be made later in April as to which books to take on.

Two books will be published in the spring of 2011 and two more later in the fall, with the goal of increasing the number of titles in the future. As their leaflet states,

Ideas have developed in discussions with like-minded people, many of them in related work. These include booksellers; publishing folk in large and small publishers; authors; translators; and Arts Council advisors. Some of these will be on an advisory board, for example the writers Amit Chaudhuri and Vahni Capildeo, Rebecca Carter (Harvill Secker), Sophie Lewis (Dalkey Archive Press, Litro), Rachael McGill (playwright, translator and organizational development consultant), and Martin Curley (web producer).

It sounds very promising, especially since it’s a wonderful opportunity for new translators and those interested in contemporary international fiction to get involved and join the literary discussion of vibrant new work. Visit the Website.


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