This month we join the publishing world in celebrating Argentina, guest of honor at the Frankfurt Book Fair and a pulse point of the vibrant Latin American literary scene. As might be expected of the heirs of Borges and Cortázar, the writers featured here both reflect and extend the masters’ work, combining a touch of the fantastic with surprising turns of both plot and phrase. The prolific Ana María Shua sends an alien invader in a clever disguise. Guillermo Martínez watches a couple struggle with chance and unimaginable loss. Sergio Bizzio’s teens pull a disappearing act. Irish-Argentine Juan José Delaney considers mortality, while young star Samanta Schweblin practices unorthodox family planning. In two tales of the Dirty War, writer and journalist Mempo Giardinelli metes out a karmic revenge, and Edgar Brau reports from a prison camp. Poet Maria Negroni stands at the mouth of hell. National Critics Prize-winner Andrés Neuman’s quarreling couple literally draws a line in the sand. The great Silvina Ocampo pens a gentle fable. And in contributions from other languages, Witold Gombrowicz's widow collects tales of his time in Argentina, and Lúcia Bettencourt reveals the secrets of Borges’s muse.

Elsewhere this month, Dimitris Athinakis talks texts with Peter Constantine and searches for an equation, and Yang Zi files a farm report.




Also in this Issue

Someone Around Here is Looking for an Equation

My fingernails grow; they reach the ceiling.



Exploding Cow

Docile black eyes stare out in terror.



Book Reviews

Mahmoud Darwish’s “Journal of an Ordinary Grief”

Every artist, particularly if they happen to be a good one, is in a sense posthumous


Buddhadeva Bose’s “My Kind of Girl”

A brief encounter with a young couple in love inspires the men to pass the time by telling stories of love from their own lives.