Now showing: a celebration of film around the world. We're offering a double bill of documentaries and features, with memoirs from international directors and screenwriters complemented by tales of characters immersed in a world of film. From close-up to wide angle, on location and off in a dream world, these writers provide a panoramic view of the cinematic world. In two stories of film's international reach, Ryu Murakami's yakuza finds a soulmate in small-town Texas, while João Paulo Cuenca's Brazilian slacker aspires to la dolce vita. Montreal's Robert Paquin describes the delicate art of dubbing profanity. Japanese director Nishikawa Miwa recalls the nightmare origins of her Sway, and Michelangelo Antonioni's assistant director Flavio Niccolini shares his diary from the set of the masterpiece Red Desert. Strega Prize-winner and screenwriter Domenico Starnone recounts the beginning of his lifelong infatuation with film. And the great Saadat Hasan Manto pens an amused portrait of the Pakistani star Noor Jehan. We hope you'll find this issue a blockbuster.

Elsewhere, in poetry from three continents, Algeria's Habib Tengour reflects on exile and identity, Australia's Cobbin Dale spins an Aboriginal folk tale, and Vietnam's Nguyen Phan Que Mai moves between earth and sky. In the second installment of "Our Man in Madrid," Peruvian Jorge Eduardo Benavides depicts a society caught in the grip of a deadly presence. In another story of menacing elements,  Eom Jeong-Hui and Ko Im-Hong return with the second chapter of their graphic novel The Secret of Frequency A.


Our Man in Madrid

The Reckoning

That Presence—long feared—was once again in our midst.



Poetry from Three Continents

Crossing

Noon is an extravagant abyss.


From the Deep Earth

Your gaze opens the sky. The sun rises and forgets to set.


Freeing Myself

The wind hands me a pair of wings and tells me to free myself from wings.


Thangara

He roamed the land eating men.


The Secret of Frequency A: An Incredible Disaster, part two

If they find out he's doing research for us, we're doomed!



Book Reviews

The Selected Stories of Mercè Rodoreda

Rodoreda’s characters struggle with the crushing realities of life—airless marriages, the shrinking of dreams and horizons brought on by war and poverty, illness and grief, separations and departures.


Dezsö Kosztolányi’s “Kornel Esti: A Novel”

Esti is not a classic, Gothic doppelganger, not Jekyll to the narrator's Hyde, but more of a magician who can seem to lift a house by playing a magic flute.