With a nod to the doomsday prophecy, we're launching 2012 with writing about apocalypse. In two riffs on the Old Testament, André-Marcel Adamek builds a Belgian ark, while Fernando Paiva eulogizes the Creator. Ofir Touché Gafla counts down the hours in a runaway city. Sławomir Mrożek awaits the end of days at McDonald's. Hector G. Oesterheld and Solano Lopez depict a deadly snowfall in Buenos Aires. Gyrðir Elíasson sees banned books in Iceland's future. Antônio Xerxenesky exposes a conspiracy to rewrite a famous ending. And Mexico’s Ambar Past provides an incantatory oracle. We trust you’ll enjoy these apocalyptic visions; and if not, well, it’s not the end of the world. Elsewhere, Luis Nuño slips out for a smoke, Juan Villoro misses connections, and Alber Sabanoglu heads to sea.




Also in this Issue





Book Reviews

Dubravka Ugresic’s “Karaoke Culture”

Part of the allure is for the amateur to wrest the microphone away from the stars and, for a moment, to take their place in the limelight.


Tomás Eloy Martínez’s “Purgatory”

On a certain level, "Purgatory" is a metaphorical ghost story—a meditation on loss, invisibility, and vanishing


Ketchup

I burned down the McDonald’s, for the sake of my life

God’s Obituary

Curiously, in recent years God became the most outspoken critic of his own work

House No. 451

She finds my writing bizarre; no one does it, especially not in a town like this.