The Nobel Prize in Literature: Our Office Pool

By Susan Harris

Between the World Cup and the World Series comes high season for world literature: time to place your bets on this year’s candidates for the Nobel Prize in Literature. You can read two of the usual suspects, Adonis and Ko Un, right here, as well as 2008 laureate J. M. G. Le Clézio, 1988 laureate Naguib Mahfouz, and, of course, any number of contenders. The Nobels will start rolling out with Physiology/Medicine on October 5 through Economics on the 13th; as always, Literature brings up the rear, at a date to be announced later. In the meantime, we invite your speculations, nominations, dark horses, wild cards, and longshots from now till Stockholm breaks the news (and a dozen writers’ hearts). UPDATE: The Nobel committee has moved up the literature announcement to Thursday, October 8.


Comments

1

For the last few years I have been holding my breath for Alice Munro.
COMMENT: Philip Roth is currently at the top of list, not only for his corpus of works, but also for his role in promoting Central European writers.
COMMENT: Okay, I’m bad at these sorts of things and for the most part, Nobel potentials aren’t the literature I hang around with since I seem to have a penchant for the obscure. But I’ll go with a long-shot who’s not even on the Ladbrokes’ list. Javier Marias. Sure I pick him because I’ve been making my way through his books for the past few years, but I have heard his name and Nobel in the same sentence before and I think he has some of the right ‘criteria’ (cynical as that may be) for the Nobel judges.
COMMENT: In light of last year’s comments about America’s lack of engagement with the rest of the world (in terms of literature, though I suppose it applies in other ways as well), I am going to refrain from suggesting Philip Roth, though I do think he deserves it.

2

Philip Roth is currently at the top of list, not only for his corpus of works, but also for his role in promoting Central European writers.

3

Okay, I’m bad at these sorts of things and for the most part, Nobel potentials aren’t the literature I hang around with since I seem to have a penchant for the obscure. But I’ll go with a long-shot who’s not even on the Ladbrokes’ list. Javier Marias. Sure I pick him because I’ve been making my way through his books for the past few years, but I have heard his name and Nobel in the same sentence before and I think he has some of the right ‘criteria’ (cynical as that may be) for the Nobel judges.

4

In light of last year’s comments about America’s lack of engagement with the rest of the world (in terms of literature, though I suppose it applies in other ways as well).

I am going to refrain from suggesting Philip Roth, though I do think he deserves it.

5

For the last few years I have been holding my breath for Alice Munro.

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