Archives

August, 2007

Paradiso Re-translated

Jean and Robert Hollander have just come out with the last installment of their translation of the Divine Comedy. The release of the final canticle of the Hollanders' triad is discussed in this week's New Yorker. Jean Hollander deals with the verse in the pair's translations, and Robert, ostensibly with…...

Strange Book in a Strange Land

If the life of the mind is what binds us across differences of nation, belief and race, then surely bookstores are the outposts of that warm and inviting brotherhood. Maud Newton has been running short features from her readers on bookstores across America and the world that they are particularly fond…...

Burning Down Madurai

In honour of a trip to Chennai tomorrow, here's a post dedicated to a gem of Tamil literature that I recently revisited after many years. R. Parthasarathy's translation of Ilango Adigal's Tamil-language epic, the Silapadikaram, or the Epic of the Anklet is a fantastic read, not least of all for the hallowed…...

Googlies in Dublin and Madrid

The Guardian has a story on Ian Gibson's Viento del Sur (Wind of the South), which was recently published in Spain and is rapidly selling out its printrun. The twist in this otherwise ordinary publishing success story is that though Gibson has been a Spanish national for over 20 years, he was born and…...

Writing 60 Years Later

It's the eve of Indian Independence Day, and a round-up of some of the current writing on the occasion of the nation's 60th year of independence seems to be in order: Pankaj Mishra speaks about the legacy of Indian nationalism in his New Yorker review of Alex von Tunzelbeck's Indian Summer and the growing…...

A Rather Strange Career Change

It has now been two weeks since I came to this small village in the Bavarian Alps. The village itself is pretty, and the lake nearby might be even described as beautiful. One could easily think that I traveled to Bavaria to spend my holiday here. Maybe I came here because of my childhood memories. Even…...

Another Word for Murder

It's hot. It's humid. We're sticky. It's Friday and already this week we've watched the New York City Transit system crumble in the wake of a tornado in Brooklyn(?!) It's definitely August--and time to get away. But what to read? Springfield Massachusetts, it turns out, has the answer. Courtesy of an…...

Bud Parr on Witold Gombrowicz

Bud Parr, over at Chekhov's Mistress has a brief review of Witold Gombrowicz's short story collection Bacacay (Archipelago Books) that's a great preview of the quirky, beautiful style of this underread master of 20th-Century fiction. Parr's favorite story, Adventures, was also one that we loved. For…...

Jack Kerouac Sur la Route

It seems like everyone is celebrating the 50th anniversary of On the Road by recreating Jack Kerouac's trip across America, but Pierre-Olivier Labbe's blog at Le Monde Online is a wonderful reminder of the original spirit of Kerouac's journey. As Labbe describes it, Ce reportage photographique propose…...

New Fiction from Daniil Kharms

Look out for never-before-translated short fiction by Russian absurdist and Words without Borders author Daniil Kharms in this week's issue of the New Yorker. Kharms' work, suppressed by the Soviet government during his lifetime and still underrepresented in translation, is a must-read for his inventiveness…...

George Tabori

On July 23 the theater director, playwright and writer George Tabori died. Unfortunately, Mr. Tabori is not widely known outside Germany and Austria. His relative obscurity doesn't do justice to the quality of his texts. (I cannot judge the quality of Mr. Tabori as a theater director. I have never seen…...

July, 2007

Welcome Three Percent!

The indefatigable Chad Post and E.J. Van Lanen have just launched their wide-ranging blog at the University of Rochester, appropriately entitled Three Percent, which reflects the percentage of books translated into English every year in the U.S. Congratulations to both Chad and E.J. on this fresh, and…...

A Visa Success?

Over at Inside Higher Ed, they're reporting a visa success story that goes to show mostly just how hard it is to get a visa in the current environment. Waskar Ari, a Bolivian national and professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln receives his US work visa, but only after the University sues…...

June, 2007

This Week in Diacritics

With this issue, we present our most challenging translation: the redesign and re-engineering of the WWB site. During the transition, a number of codes and special characters were muddled, including—mortifyingly—our beloved diacritics. Which got me thinking about these sherpas of foreign…...

Teacher’s Forum

This forum is for teachers of world literature to exchange ideas on using WWB in the classroom. Tell us your favorite story to teach, activities you've used for teaching literature in translation, post your own syllabi, and/or ask questions of your fellow teachers. This is your forum. We look forward…...

Translation Talk

This forum is for you, our readers interested in translation, practitioners of translation, and others, to ask questions, exchange ideas, and share thoughts on the topic of translation. If you wish to ask our translators a question, please note who your question is for and/or the name of the relevant…...

Discussions On Translation

Words Without Borders presents forums on literature and translation.

Job Announcements

Use this forum to post your job openings, internships and other opportunities for writers, editors and translators.

Events Calendar

Please announce your upcoming events here.

Words Without Borders Book Groups

Tired of the same six titles on display at the store and want some recommendations on what to read next? Looking for a few, cool people to talk about the newest titles from the international scene? If so, join in the Words without Borders book clubs. Each forum will run for a month, so tune in any time…...

Reading Adam Phillips

Last fall I briefly met the American author Benjamin Kunkel in a hotel in Amsterdam. All foreign authors who come to Amsterdam stay, for some reason, in the Ambassade Hotel, and since I don't have an apartment in Amsterdam I stay in the Ambassade Hotel as well. Yes, I do have a mother in Amsterdam, a…...

The Smallest Publisher in the World

What are you willing to do for your favorite book? If you consider yourself a book lover, think again. What follows is the most incredible story I've ever heard about loving a novel. Last December, after a reading in Padua, I was approached by a young woman who gave me a book as a present. "I am the…...

The Illusion of Return

Last Monday, I had lunch in London with the Lebanese-Palestinian author Samir El-Youssef. We were supposed to go to a Lebanese restaurant called Beirut Express, but since it was too crowded there, he took me to another Lebanese restaurant nearby.Next to our table there was a small artificial lake with…...

May, 2007

The Moral Responsibility of the Author

There are so many book fairs out there that you could keep yourself busy for one year traveling from one book fair to the next. Last I weekend, I was in Turin, Italy for 48 hours at the Turin Book Fair. At every book fair there is this moment that I ask myself: What is the purpose of the book fair, again?…...

The Brooklyn Rail in Translation

The Brooklyn Rail has boldly launched a new initiative to publish translations of both short fiction and plays online. In Translation promotes literary translations and encourages collaboration between translators, authors, editors and publishers. Their launch issue presents Excerpts from Sodom and Berlin…...

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