Archives

January, 2011

A Rumbling Octopus: Egyptians Take to the Streets in Protest

"The square’s full.  The streets feeding into it are full…There’s never been a demonstration like this before…Egypt appeared to be one great demonstration, united in one person and a single chant.” —from Palace Walk, by Naguib Mahfouz, translated by William…...

From Angoulême: European Comics in Anglophone Markets

Thursday, I attended a session in the “rights balloon” (let’s hope it’s not a “rights bubble”) entitled “Franco-Belgian BD business in the USA Today.” The panel, moderated by noted English comics blogger Paul Gravett, consisted of four American editors,…...

Angoulême Bubbles Over

Angoulême! It’s an eyegasm. As promised. The sky, overcast since Paris, finally brightened as the TGV pulled past Poitiers without stopping. From my seat, I was playing the game I always do when going to geek cons, whether comics or science-fiction and fantasy: spot your fellow travelers.…...

Debeurme, Berberian, and Denis, Signing in Brussels

Frit Flagey is regularly considered one of the best fry joints (friterie, or fritkot) in Brussels. It’s also one of the slowest, and so can always be spotted by its line, in which smatterings of many languages and diversely accented French are often heard. Over the last year it has moved three…...

Book Reviews: Who Should Write about Literature in Translation?

Translation was a central subject with a panel of book review editors this week, at the Center for Fiction in New York. The event, “Book Reviews, Revamped,” was put on in partnership with the National Book Critics Circle, and moderated by the organization’s president, Jane Ciabattari.…...

The City and the Writer: In Damascus with Abed Ismael

Image of The City and the Writer: In Damascus with Abed Ismael
If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains.                       …...

In Memoriam: Abdellatif el Jaziri, 1969–2010

Abdellatif el Jaziri was a Moroccan from Fez with a fine Berber head (long and narrow, with a strong chin and prominent cheekbones) and an unflappable sense of humor.  Until recently, he taught Arabic in New York City. “Sometimes it seemed like half the city wanted him to teach them Arabic,”…...

La Grève, C’est Grave (Striking is a Serious Business)

Shortly after celebrating its twentieth anniversary in May, French indie comics powerhouse L’Association now finds itself at a stalemate with its employees, who’ve gone on strike to protest a recent round of holiday layoffs that reduced the salaried staff by half. Indie comics remains a small,…...

Humphrey Davies Wins 2010 Saif Ghobash-Banipal Prize

Congratulations to our marvelous Arabic translator Humphrey Davies, winner of the 2010 Saif Ghobash–Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation for his translation of Elias Khoury's novel Yalo. Humphrey also won the inaugural Saif Ghobash–Banipal Prize in 2006 for his translation of…...

A Training Manual for Murder

Ambar Past's mordant "Practice for Hangmen," from our March 2007 issue, offers a training manual for executioners. Jumping off from a Reuters report on the unfortunate results of flawed execution, Past puts a twist to the list poem. Acknowledging the inherent problem of practice, she advises, "Get…...

From the Translator: Jethro Soutar on Translating José Pérez Reyes’s “In Hock”

In this installment of our "From the Translator" series, translator Jethro Soutar talks about the process of translating José Pérez Reyes's "In Hock,"  from the January 2011 issue of WWB. When reading in a foreign language, the translator can’t help but be constantly thinking:…...

A Confucian Celerity: On “Angina Day: Selected Poems” by Günter Eich

Image of A Confucian Celerity: On “Angina Day: Selected Poems” by Günter Eich
Throughout his years of exile, Bertolt Brecht carried little with him: his manuscripts, his smoker's paraphernalia, and a black scroll containing a painting of Confucius, which he would hang somewhere near his desk by the window. East Asian themes had always fascinated Brecht. In 1950, he published…...

From the Translator: Andrea Labinger on Angela Pradelli’s “The Bather”

In the latest in our "From the Translator" series , translator Andrea Labinger talks about Angela Pradelli's novel Amigas mías, from which "The Bather" is taken. Amigas mías, from which “The Bather” comes, has been described as  “[a] novel that precisely and subtly…...

From the Translator: David Ball and Nicole Ball on Abdourahman A. Waberi’s “Passage of Tears”

The French-Djiboutian writer Abdourahman A. Waberi was one of the writers to whom J.M.G. Le Clézio dedicated his Nobel Prize in his acceptance speech. Waberi has won many literary prizes and honors; his work has been translated into German, Italian, and Portuguese. He has received lavish praise…...

The Worst Editing Job in the World

. . . is the task accepted by the narrator of Horacio Castellanos Moya's Senselessness. In this extract from our issue of October 2006, a self-described "depraved atheist" writer is hired by the Catholic Church to edit an eleven-hundred-page report on the military's massacres of Indian villages. …...

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