Archives

October, 2007

French/American and Florence Gould Foundation Translation Prize

The French American and Florence Gould Foundations have just announced their annual prize for translation. The prize (which comes with a 10,000-dollar bonus on the side) rewards a recent translation of a work of fiction or non-fiction from French into English. Excluded categories include children's literature,…...

Arthur Philips on “The Rebels”, “Embers” and Gyula Krúdy

Arthur Phillips was born in Minneapolis in 1969 and educated at Harvard. He has been a child actor, a jazz musician, a speechwriter, a dismally failed entrepreneur, and a five-time Jeopardy! champion. His first novel, Prague, a national bestseller, was named a New York Times Notable Book, and received…...

All the Bad Young Literary Women

Last Sunday's NYT Book Review has a front page feature on Edith Grossman's new translation of The Bad Girl by Mario Vargas Llosa. The review looks at the influence of Flaubert at play in Llosa's book. A great admirer of Flaubert's, Llosa casts his titular bad girl as the familiar love 'em…...

David Leavitt Responds to Mark Sarvas in Our Book Club

Renowned novelist David Leavitt (The Indian Clerk, The Body of Jonah Boyd) doubles as the editor of Subtropics, the literary journal of the University of Florida. In Issue 3, Leavitt included the opening chapter of The Rebels, and I invited him to talk here a little about why he chose it. 1) How did…...

Returning to Afghanistan

While publishers, agents and some authors were heading for Frankfurt for the annual book fair I decided to return to Afghanistan—or to be more precise Oruzgan, a small province in the south—where some 1,600 Dutch soldiers are trying to rebuild the country. A year ago I stayed at Kandahar Air…...

Mark Sarvas Talks about Fathers and Sons in “The Rebels”

Leading a book group discussion on Sándor Márai's The Rebels, one is faced with an interesting dilemma, one to which Arthur Phillips politely alluded to in his excellent New Yorker review. To begin, he told us: Sándor Márai keeps getting younger. Twelve years after he committed…...

Free Aung San Suu Kyi!

As the feeding frenzy that is Frankfurt Book Fair gets into full swing, a more mindful energy is fuelling the monks leading the people power revolution against the Military Junta in Burma. Last Saturday, thousands of demonstrators marched from Millbank, looped across the River Thames, and ended up in…...

Celan’s Schneepart

A short while ago Patrick Kurp wrote a piece on Primo Levi's conflicted perspective on the work of Paul Celan. More recently, James Buchan at the Guardian's Book Blog discusses Ian Fairley's translation of Celan's Schneepart, and in the process, sheds light on the role of the darkness and obscurity that…...

October Book Club—“The Rebels” by Sándor Márai

This October, we're delighted to host a new installment in the WWB-Reading the World Book Clubs with a feature on Hungarian author Sándor Márai's The Rebels. Discussion will be headed by Mark Sarvas from The Elegant Variation, with contributions from David Leavitt and others. The Rebels…...

Reading Bioy Casares

I had never heard the name Adolfo Bioy Casares until I read a lengthy review of his diaries in Times Literary Supplement What Eckermann was to Goethe, Mr. Bioy was to Jorge Luis Borges. He aspired to be him. Mr. Bioy's diaries are 1644 pages (even in the edited version), but based on the review,…...

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